Anaphylactic shock following a bite of a wild Kayan slow loris (Nycticebus kayan) in rural Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo.

Anaphylactic shock following a bite of a wild Kayan slow loris (Nycticebus kayan) in rural Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Rural Remote Health. 2019 Aug;19(3):5163 Authors: Steve Utap M, Bin Mohd Jamal MS Abstract Nycticebus spp, commonly known as the slow lorus, is a small nocturnal primate found mainly in Asia. The adult slow loris weighs between 265 g and 1150 g depending on the type of species. It has a characteristic round head with large, forward-facing eyes. Slow lorises are known for their poisonous bite and are the only venomous primates. To date, there have been two published cases of slow loris bite in humans. This case report illustrates a case of anaphylactic shock following a bite of a wild Kayan slow loris (Nycticebus kayan) to a young man at Mulu District, in a remote area of Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. The patient developed dyspnoea, a feeling of suffocation, swollen lips and cramp-like sensations over both hands. He subsequently developed syncope and hypotension. The patient was clinically stable following intramuscular injection of adrenaline 0.5 mg stat dose. PMID: 31421666 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Rural and Remote Health - Category: Rural Health Tags: Rural Remote Health Source Type: research

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Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
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Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: The Tox Cave - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
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