Individualized Piano Instruction for Improving Cognition in Breast Cancer Survivors.

Individualized Piano Instruction for Improving Cognition in Breast Cancer Survivors. Oncol Nurs Forum. 2019 Sep 01;46(5):605-615 Authors: Rodriguez-Wolfe M, Anglade D, Gattamorta KA, Hurwitz WB, Pirl WF Abstract PURPOSE: To evaluate the use of individualized piano instruction (IPI) for improving cognition among breast cancer survivors. PARTICIPANTS & SETTING: Six participants were included in an eight-week piano program with three data collection time points at baseline, midpoint, and postintervention. Participants were recruited from the breast cancer clinic of a university cancer center in South Florida. METHODOLOGIC APPROACH: Neurocognitive, psychosocial, and self-report assessments were conducted to determine potential benefits and program feasibility, including the NIH Toolbox® Cognition Battery, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT)-Cognitive Function, the FACT-Breast, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, and a participant questionnaire. FINDINGS: Results related to potential benefits suggest that IPI may significantly improve overall cognition in breast cancer survivors, with fluid cognition showing improvement. In addition, IPI may improve quality of life and self-reported measures of depression and anxiety, with large to moderate effect sizes, respectively. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Nurses should explore different treatment options for chemotherapy-related cognitive impa...
Source: Oncology Nursing Forum - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Oncol Nurs Forum Source Type: research

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CONCLUSION: We identified certain risk factors for breast cancer in our study populationand Gail model is a reliable and useful breast cancer risk prediction model for clinical decision-making. This studycontributes to the body of evidence in order to facilitate early detection and better plan for possible malignancies inTurkish population. PMID: 31244298 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Asian Pac J Cancer Prev Source Type: research
Karin Meissner1,2*, Nicola Talsky1, Elisabeth Olliges1,2, Carmen Jacob1,3,4, Oliver J. Stötzer5, Christoph Salat5, Michael Braun6 and Raluca Flondor1 1Institute of Medical Psychology, Faculty of Medicine, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany 2Division of Health Promotion, Coburg University of Applied Sciences, Coburg, Germany 3Clinical Neurosciences, Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom 4Wessex Neurological Centre, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom 5Haematology and Oncology, Outpatient Cancer Ca...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Conclusions: mTBI patients continue to be told to rest for longer than expert recommendations and practice guidelines. This study supports growing evidence that prolonged rest after mTBI is generally unhelpful, as patients in the exposure group were less likely to have resumed work/school at 1–2 months post-injury. We could not identify patient characteristics associated with getting prolonged rest advice. Further exploration of who gets told to rest and who delivers the advice could inform strategic de-implementation of this clinical practice. Introduction In the early twenty-first century, complete rest until...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion: These results suggested that DDS could be used as a supplemental screening tool for psychological distress in breast cancer patients. PMID: 29686600 [PubMed - in process]
Source: J Korean Med Sci - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: J Korean Med Sci Source Type: research
It’s no secret that stress can be deadly. It weakens your immune system… It increases your risk of heart disease… But new research shows that stress can be particularly deadly for people with cancer. A recent study in Australia found that stress allows cancer to spread six times faster. Aussie researchers tracked breast cancer cells in mice. They tagged the cancer cells with a fluorescent marker. Then they used state-of-the-art imaging to see tumor cells that had spread into the lymph system.1 What they saw was remarkable… The images showed that stress increases the number and size of lymph ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Cancer Health heart disease immune system stress Source Type: news
Conclusions: According to our results, resilience can negative influence depressive symptomatology. Moreover, lower levels of depression can lead to fewer anxiety symptoms. PMID: 28952298 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Asian Pac J Cancer Prev Source Type: research
Conclusions: Nature contact may offer a range of human health benefits. Although much evidence is already available, much remains unknown. A robust research effort, guided by a focus on key unanswered questions, has the potential to yield high-impact, consequential public health insights. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1663 Received: 26 January 2017 Revised: 12 May 2017 Accepted: 25 May 2017 Published: 31 July 2017 Address correspondence to H. Frumkin, Dept. of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington School of Public Health, Box 354695, Seattle, WA 98195-4695 USA; Telephone: 206-897-1723;...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
By Susan Blumenthal, M.D. and Alexandrea Adams The recent commemoration of National Women’s Health Week provided an important time to mark the progress that has been made in advancing women’s health over the past two decades and to highlight what more needs to be done to achieve women’s health equity in America. Historically, women have experienced discrimination in health care despite making 80 percent of health care decisions for their families, using more medical services than men, and suffering greater disability from chronic disease. Before the mid 1990’s, women were often excluded as subjects ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
On Thursday afternoon, the American Health Care Act passed in the House by a slim margin ― and the effect it will have on women specifically could be devastating.  Simply put, the bill would allow states to discriminate against women. Before Obamacare, insurers could consider the following pre-existing conditions: being pregnant, having had postpartum depression, being a survivor of sexual assault, having had a C-section or being a survivor of domestic violence. Under the AHCA, states are allowed to waive the requirement that insurers cover people with pre-existing conditions, meaning if you’re deeme...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This article breaks down what it means to feel stressed versus depressed. Stress will signal changes that need to be made that are specific, such as lack of sleep or unhappiness at your job, where as depression hangs around longer than little ‘spells’ like stress, and is usually triggered by something or feels like it just pops out of nowhere. http://www.beliefnet.com/wellness/health/emotional-health/depression/depressed-or-just-stressed.aspx Feeling powerless in our current world is a commonality we all share. However, some people develop real anxieties and fears based on the unpredictability of our future...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured health and fitness psychology self improvement anxiety best depression blogs pickthebrain Source Type: blogs
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