Cardiovascular disease risk greater in people prone to insomnia - study

People genetically predisposed to sleep problems have greater risk of heart failure and stroke, say researchersPeople who struggle with sleep might be at greater risk of developing cardiovascular problems, research suggests.Scientists have found that people who are genetically predisposed to insomnia have a greater risk of heart failure, stroke and coronary artery disease.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sleep Health & wellbeing Life and style Science Heart disease Stroke UK news Society Source Type: news

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Renin –angiotensin–aldosterone system inhibitors have proven clinical benefit in management of patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. However, there are no guidelines to manage decline in kidney function that occurs with initiation and titration of renin–angiotensin–aldosteron e system agents during management of heart failure. We discuss the complex interplay of kidney function and heart failure in the presence of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system agents and suggest a clinical algorithm for management of acute decline in kidney function.
Source: Kidney International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 October 2019Source: Preventive MedicineAuthor(s): Robert C. Whitaker, Allison N. Herman, Tracy Dearth-Wesley, Kenneth Hubbell, Ryan Huff, Liam J. Heneghan, Peter C. RoweAbstractAlthough mindfulness-based interventions may be effective in addressing the common symptom of fatigue, no population-based studies have examined the relationship between mindfulness and fatigue. We determined whether higher levels of dispositional mindfulness were associated with lower levels of fatigue. Cross-sectional data were obtained through the Pennsylvania Head Start Staff Wellness Survey, a 2012 web-base...
Source: Preventive Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Science tells us that a lot of good things happen in our brains while we sleep – learning and memories are consolidated and waste is removed, among other things. New research shows for the first time that important immune cells called microglia – which play an important role in reorganizing the connections between nerve cells, fighting infections, and repairing damage – are also primarily active while we sleep.
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: news
Source: Clinical Drug Investigation - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Orexins [orexin-A (OXA) and orexin-B (OXB)] are two isoforms of neuropeptides produced by the hypothalamus. The main biological actions of orexins, focused on the central nervous system, are to control the sleep/wake process, appetite and feeding, energy homeostasis, drug addiction, and cognitive processes. These effects are mediated by two G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) subtypes named OX1R and OX2R. In accordance with the synergic and dynamic relationship between the nervous and immune systems, orexins also have neuroprotective and immuno-regulatory (i.e., anti-inflammatory) properties. The present review gathers recen...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
ConclusionsLinagliptin showed cardiovascular and renal safety in Asian patients with T2DM and established CVD with albuminuria and/or kidney disease.
Source: Diabetology International - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
ConclusionsNon-motor symptoms are independent of motor features and likely belong to the clinical spectrum of blepharospasm. The presence of non-motor symptoms possibly reflects a complex network disorder of blepharospasm.
Source: Journal of Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Typically, when medical device companies or physicians want to study a specific condition or disease state, they experiment on either cadavers or animals. But finding a cadaver that fits the criteria of one of these pathologies, such as scoliosis or congenital heart disease, can be difficult. And if such cadavers can be found, the cost to procure, maintain, and dispose of them is significant. Animal studies have the same cost-effectiveness issues. And, while animal anatomy can be similar to human anatomy, it is not exactly the same. “But now [customers] can have organ models printed in 3D, on demand,&acir...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: 3-D Printing Source Type: news
People genetically predisposed to sleep problems have greater risk of stroke and coronary artery diseasePeople who struggle with sleep might be at greater risk of developing cardiovascular problems, research suggests.Scientists have found that people who are genetically predisposed to insomnia have a greater risk of heart failure, stroke and coronary artery disease.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sleep Health & wellbeing Life and style Science Heart disease Stroke UK news Society Source Type: news
ConclusionDespite some limitations in the design of this study, we found that most of the treated patients for primary RLS had no association with CVD and hypertension after controlling for key potential confounders. Comorbid CVD or hypertension was associated with cardiovascular risk factors, but not with RLS features except for older age at onset.
Source: PLoS One - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
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