New hydrogels show promise in treating bone defects

Bioengineers and dentists from the UCLA School of Dentistry have developed a new hydrogel that is more porous and effective in promoting tissue repair and regeneration compared to hydrogels that are currently available. Once injected in a mouse model, the new hydrogel is shown to induce migration of naturally occurring stem cells to better promote bone healing. Current experimental applications using hydrogels and stem cells introduced into the body or expensive biological agents can come with negative side effects.The  findings, published online in the journal Nature Communications, suggest that in the near future the  next generation of hydrogel systems could greatly improve current biomaterial-based therapeutics to repair bone defects.Hydrogels are biomaterials that are made up of a 3D network of polymer chains. Due to the network ’s ability to absorb water and its structural similarities to living tissue, it can be used to deliver cells to defective areas to regenerate lost tissue. However, the small pore size of hydrogels limits the survival of transplanted cells, their expansion and new tissue formation, making this less than ideal for regenerating tissue.One material that has caught on in the field of biomaterials is the naturally occurring mineral, clay. Clay has become an ideal additive to medical products with no reported negative effects. It has been shown to be biocompatible and is readily available.The clay is structured in layers, with ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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Authors: Mandlik Ingawale DS, Namdeo AG Abstract Withania somnifera, commonly known as "Ashwagandha" or "Indian ginseng" is an essential therapeutic plant of Indian subcontinent regions. It is regularly used, alone or in combination with other plants for the treatment of various illnesses in Indian Systems of Medicine over the period of 3,000 years. Ashwagandha (W. somnifera) belongs to the genus Withania and family Solanaceae. It comprises a broad spectrum of phytochemicals having wide range of biological effects. W. somnifera has demonstrated various biological actions such as anti-canc...
Source: Journal of Dietary Supplements - Category: Nutrition Tags: J Diet Suppl Source Type: research
This report provides an in-depth look at public drug program spending in Canada, using the Canadian Institute for Health Information's (CIHI) National Prescription Drug Utilization Information System. Public drug program spending does not include spending on drugs dispensed in hospitals or on those funded through cancer agencies and other special programs. Public drug program spending increased by 6.8% in 2018, compared to an increase of 5.3% in 2017. The growth in 2018 was largely because of the introduction of Ontario Health Insurance Plan+ (OHIP+), which extended drug coverage to all Ontario residents age 24 years or y...
Source: Healthcare Quarterly - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Abstract Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is mostly caused by mutations in the iron-regulatory gene HFE. The disease is associated with iron overload, resulting in liver cirrhosis/cancer, cardiomegaly, kidney dysfunction, diabetes, and arthritis. Fe2+-induced oxidative damage is suspected in the etiology of these symptoms. Here we examined, using Hfe-/- mice, whether disruption of uric acid (UA) homeostasis plays any role in HH-associated arthritis. We detected elevated levels of UA in serum and intestine in Hfe-/-mice compared to controls. Though the expression of xanthine oxidase, which generates UA, was not diff...
Source: The Biochemical Journal - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Biochem J Source Type: research
  Cannabis, weed, marijuana, pot. It goes by several names, but we all know what it smells like. As weed becomes more mainstream, we on the Not Crazy podcast want to know: Is marijuana really an effective treatment for anxiety? Is it just a coping mechanism? Or a vice? In today’s podcast, Gabe and Jackie look at the research and weigh out the evidence. They also interview Eileen Davidson, a rheumatoid arthritis patient who regularly uses marijuana as a medicine to see what she has to say. What’s your take? Tune in for an open-minded discussion about weed. (Transcript Available Below) SUBSCRIBE &REV...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Medications Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs
Abstract Immune related adverse events (irAEs) have been observed with all checkpoint inhibitors and are very frequent. The evidences coming from experimental models of congenital or acquired deficiency of CTLA-4 or from PD-1 knock-out mice, provided all the informations to interpret the organ or systemic manifestations (endocrine, or systemic autoimmune chronic inflammatory diseases-ACIDs) observed in trials as well as in registries of cohorts treated with anti-CTLA-4 or anti-PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors, or combination therapies. Finally the concern raised by cancers occurring in patients with autoimmune diseases (Syst...
Source: Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Clin Immunol Source Type: research
This study, for the first time, shows that transplantation of non-autologous mitochondria from healthy skeletal muscle cells into normal cardiomyocytes leads to short-term improvement of bioenergetics indicating "supercharged" state. However, over time these improved effects disappear, which suggests transplantation of mitochondria may have a potential application in settings where there is an acute stress. Outlining Some of the Science Behind Partial Reprogramming at Turn.bio https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/03/outlining-some-of-the-science-behind-partial-reprogramming-at-turn-bio/ Tur...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Purpose of review This review summarizes the current evidence on treatment strategies for inflammatory arthritis because of cancer treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI), prognosis of ICI-induced arthritis, and management of patients with preexisting inflammatory arthritis receiving ICI therapy. Recent findings Inflammatory arthritis is the most common rheumatic immune-related adverse event observed in patients receiving ICI therapy. Most patients can successfully be treated with low doses of corticosteroids or conventional synthetic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). A small minority will dev...
Source: Current Opinion in Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: Edited by Joshua F. Baker Source Type: research
Abstract Understanding the mechanisms that control the body's response to inflammation is of key importance, due to its involvement in myriad medical conditions, including cancer, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease and asthma. While resolving inflammation has historically been considered a passive process, since the turn of the century the hunt for novel therapeutic interventions has begun to focus upon active manipulation of constituent mechanisms, particularly involving the roles of apoptosing neutrophils, phagocytosing macrophages and anti-inflammatory mediators. Moreover, there is growing interest in how inflammat...
Source: Bulletin of Mathematical Biology - Category: Bioinformatics Authors: Tags: Bull Math Biol Source Type: research
Macrophages are cells of the innate immune system, found throughout the body, and which play a great many roles beyond the obvious ones of defending against invading pathogens. They destroy cancerous and senescent cells, ingest molecular waste and debris between cells, and participate in the processes of tissue regeneration and maintenance, to pick a few examples. Further, the immune system of the brain includes an analogous population of cells known as microglia, which additionally take on supporting roles essential to the proper functioning of neurons and their synaptic connections. Chronic inflammation is importa...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsThe survival prognosis of lung cancer patients with RA is worse than that of those without RA. ILD and qi deficiency promote reduced survival when found in conjunction with RA in patients with lung cancer.
Source: Thoracic Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
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