Risk factors for influenza B virus–associated pneumonia in adults

ConclusionsThis study suggests that chronic respiratory diseases and shortness of breath are independent risk factors for influenza B virus–associated pneumonia in adult patients.
Source: American Journal of Infection Control - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

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CONCLUSION: After outpatient episode incidence of influenza, antiviral treatment has been shown to reduce the incidence of hospitalized pneumonia, especially in infants and children, during pandemic season 2017. Antiviral therapy for influenza is recommended to minimize burden caused by influenza virus infection and to reduce pneumonia. In addition, medical costs of hospitalization may decrease by antiviral therapy, especially in infants and children. PMID: 32989929 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Korean Medical Science - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: J Korean Med Sci Source Type: research
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Flu Vaccine Source Type: news
The recent pandemic of coronavirus infectious illness 2019 (COVID19) triggered by SARS-CoV-2 has rapidly spread around the globe, generating in severe events an acute, highly lethal pneumonia and death. In the past two hitherto similar CoVs, the severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV-1) and Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV) also gained universal attention as they produced clinical symptoms similar to those of SARS-CoV-2 utilizing angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) to go into the cells. COVID-19 may also present with overtly neurological symptoms. The pro...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has elicited a swift response by the scientific community to elucidate the pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2)-induced lung injury and develop effective therapeutics. Clinical data indicate that severe COVID-19 most commonly manifests as viral pneumonia-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a clinical entity mechanistically understood best in the context of influenza A virus-induced pneumonia. Similar to influenza, advanced age has emerged as the leading host risk factor for developing severe COVID-19. In this review we ...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Back to Basics Source Type: research
ConclusionFavipiravir may be an effective option for the treatment of COVID-19-infected patients with ESRD.
Source: CEN Case Reports - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Basel, 04 September 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the cobas ® SARS-CoV-2&Influenza A/B Test for use on the cobas ® 6800/8800 Systems has received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This test is intended for the simultaneous qualitative detection and differentiation of SARS-CoV-2, Influenza A and Influenza B in patients suspected by their healthcare provider of having respiratory viral infection consistent with COVID-19. Additionally, it is available in markets accepting the CE mark.“With the approaching flu season, this new ...
Source: Roche Media News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
Over the past few years, Professor Zhang Yongzhen has made it his business to sequence thousands of previously unknown viruses. But he knew straight away that this one was particularly nasty. It was about 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 3 that a metal box arrived at the drab, beige buildings that house the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. Inside was a test tube packed in dry ice that contained swabs from a patient suffering from a peculiar pneumonia sweeping China’s central city of Wuhan. But little did Zhang know that that box would also unleash a vicious squall of blame and geopolitical acrimony worthy of Pandora herself....
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news
Over the past few years, Professor Zhang Yongzhen has made it his business to sequence thousands of previously unknown viruses. But he knew straight away that this one was particularly nasty. It was about 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 3 that a metal box arrived at the drab, beige buildings that house the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. Inside was a test tube packed in dry ice that contained swabs from a patient suffering from a peculiar pneumonia sweeping China’s central city of Wuhan. But little did Zhang know that that box would also unleash a vicious squall of blame and geopolitical acrimony worthy of Pandora herself....
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news
The last time most of us gave any thought to antibodies was probably in high school biology, but we’re getting a crash refresher course thanks to COVID-19. They are, after all, the key to our best defenses against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that’s caused the global pandemic. People who have been infected likely rely on antibodies to recover, and antibodies are what vaccines are designed to produce. Or at least that’s what infectious-disease and public-health experts assume for now. Because SARS-CoV-2 is such a new virus, even the world’s best authorities aren’t yet sure what it will take to build p...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
We report that electrical stimulation (ES) stimulation of post-stroke aged rats led to an improved functional recovery of spatial long-term memory (T-maze), but not on the rotating pole or the inclined plane, both tests requiring complex sensorimotor skills. Surprisingly, ES had a detrimental effect on the asymmetric sensorimotor deficit. Histologically, there was a robust increase in the number of doublecortin-positive cells in the dentate gyrus and SVZ of the infarcted hemisphere and the presence of a considerable number of neurons expressing tubulin beta III in the infarcted area. Among the genes that were unique...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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