Metabolic health in the Middle East and north Africa

Publication date: Available online 14 August 2019Source: The Lancet Diabetes &EndocrinologyAuthor(s): Fereidoun Azizi, Farzad Hadaegh, Farhad Hosseinpanah, Parvin Mirmiran, Atieh Amouzegar, Hengameh Abdi, Golaleh Asghari, Donna Parizadeh, Seyed Ali Montazeri, Mojtaba Lotfaliany, Farzin Takyar, Davood KhaliliSummaryThe Middle East and north Africa are home to different populations with widely varying cultures, histories, and socioeconomic settings. Hence, their health status, health management, and access to appropriate health care differ accordingly. In this Review, we examine data on the historical and prospective status of metabolic diseases in this region including obesity, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Women in the Middle East and north Africa have the highest risk of metabolic diseases of all women globally, whereas men rank second of all men in this respect. Metabolic risk factors are responsible for more than 300 deaths per 100 000 individuals in this region, compared with a global mean of fewer than 250. Physical inactivity, especially in women, and an unhealthy diet (ie, low consumption of whole grains, nuts, and seafoods) stand out. More than one in every three women are obese in most countries of the region. Prevention programmes have not fully been achieved in most of these countries and the projected future is not optimistic. Comprehensive surveillance and monitoring of metabolic diseases, robust multisectoral...
Source: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research

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Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a growing challenge to global public health. It is defined as the increased accumulation of hepatic triglyceride (>5%) in the absence of excessive alcohol consumption or other causes of liver disease. The NAFLD spectrum encompasses steatosis (non-alcoholic fatty liver, NAFL) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), an inflammatory form of the condition marked by the presence of hepatocyte damage and progressive fibrosis that may lead to cirrhosis.[1,2] Although NAFLD may occur in patients with normal weight, it is closely associated with the presence of the metabolic syndrom...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
rowski Tiziana Meschi New evidence suggests that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has a strong multifaceted relationship with diabetes and metabolic syndrome, and is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events, regardless of traditional risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and obesity. Given the pandemic-level rise of NAFLD—in parallel with the increasing prevalence of obesity and other components of the metabolic syndrome—and its association with poor cardiovascular outcomes, the question of how to manage NAFLD properly, in order to reduce the burden of...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
no De Lorenzo Lifestyle interventions remain the first-line treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), even if the optimal alimentary regimen is still controversial. The interest in antioxidants has increased over time, and literature reports an inverse association between nutrients rich in antioxidants and the risk of mortality due to non-communicable diseases, including NAFLD. Mediterranean diet (MD) is a model characterized by main consumption of plant-based foods and fish and reduced consumption of meat and dairy products. MD represents the gold standard in preventive medicine, probably due to the har...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
The objective of the present study was to investigate the association between hair and urine Al levels and obesity.MethodsA total of 206 lean and 205 obese non-occupationally exposed subjects (30-50 y.o.) were enrolled in the study. Hair and urine Al levels were assessed with ICP-MS. Laboratory quality control was performed using the certified reference materials of human hair, plasma, and urine.ResultsHair and urinary Al levels in obese subjects were significantly higher by 31% and 46% compared to the control levels, respectively. The presence of hypertension (41% cases), atherosclerosis (8%), type 2 diabetes melli...
Source: Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 24 July 2019Source: Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases SupplementsAuthor(s): Imen Sebai, Ibtissem Oueslati, Emna Talbi, Emna El Feleh, Wafa Grira, Meriem Yazidi, Fatma Chaker, Melika ChihaouiAimsNon-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In addition to its liver complications, it is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The aim of our work was to assess the relationship between NAFLD and cardiovascular disease risk (CVDR) in a group of patients with T2DM.MethodsThis was a cross-sectional study conducted ...
Source: Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases Supplements - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Conclusion: NAFLD is emerging as a predominant etiology of CLD in India, followed by ALD, HBV, and HCV. However, significant regional differences regarding predominant etiology was noted within the country. It was further noted that significant number of patients had advanced fibrosis based on VCTE assessment. This study emphasizes the need for appropriate risk evaluation and early assessment of severity of liver disease, for adequate disease management. PMID: 31315327 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India - Category: General Medicine Tags: J Assoc Physicians India Source Type: research
This study aims to determine the effect of type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin therapy on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in the patients with morbid obesity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Clinical, anthropometric and laboratory data were analyzed together with intraoperative liver biopsies from morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. RESULTS: 219 patients with morbid obesity were evaluated. Systemic arterial hypertension (55.9% vs. 33.8%, p = 0.004) and dyslipidemia (67.1% vs. 39.0%, p
Source: Annals of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Ann Hepatol Source Type: research
Liver disease constitutes the third most common cause of premature death in the UK, and its prevalence is substantially higher compared to other countries in Western Europe.[1 –3] Excess liver iron is associated with increased severity and progression of liver diseases including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), [4–6] and is the direct cause of liver disease in those with hereditary haemochromatosis a nd thalassaemia.[7,8] Observational associations have been described between excess liver iron content and several metabolic diseases such as hig...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: NODAT, recurrent and de novo NAFLD are common after LT but are not associated with signs of graft dysfunction, possibly due to the low frequency of IR and NASH. No correlation is observed between NAFLD and NODAT, MS, hypertriglyceridemia, obesity and IR. β-cell dysfunction and diabetes, however, are seen in most of the patients, possibly due to calcineurin inhibitor toxicity. PMID: 31171335 [PubMed]
Source: Annals of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Ann Hepatol Source Type: research
Bianca Cox1†, Maria Tsamou1†, Karen Vrijens1, Kristof Y. Neven1, Ellen Winckelmans1, Theo M. de Kok2, Michelle Plusquin1 and Tim S. Nawrot1,3* 1Center for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Hasselt, Belgium 2Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands 3Department of Public Health, Environment and Health Unit, Leuven University (KU Leuven), Leuven, Belgium Maternal body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy is known to affect both fetal growth and later-life health of the newborn, yet the implicated molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. As the master reg...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
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