Clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy tablets for allergic rhinitis is unlikely to be derived from in vitro allergen-release data.

Clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy tablets for allergic rhinitis is unlikely to be derived from in vitro allergen-release data. Expert Rev Clin Immunol. 2019 Aug 12;:1-8 Authors: Canonica GW, Devillier P, Casale T, Demoly P, Bos C, Karagiannis E, Passalacqua G, Wahn U, Mascarell L Abstract Introduction: Allergen bioavailability underpins the efficacy and safety of SLIT tablets. Three product-related factors are likely to influence this: tablet potency, formulation and sublingual holding time. Areas covered: Tablet formulation determines the rate and extent of solubilized allergen release. Using validated in vitro dissolution assays, the two licensed grass pollen SLIT tablets are shown to release ≥85% of their total allergenic activity within several minutes. Sublingual holding time affects the contact duration between solubilized allergens and sublingual tissue. Maximal uptake of allergens by sublingual tissue requires ~5 minutes, with little uptake occurring within the first minute. A higher potency tablet with longer sublingual holding time would provide higher bioavailability, while faster rates of allergen release in vitro are unlikely to translate to a greater increase in bioavailability. Differences in dissolution times cannot serve as a surrogate of in vivo bioavailability, and are not related to differences in efficacy at the marketed tablet dosages. Rapid in vitro dissolution is likely not a key requirement for inducing a poten...
Source: Expert Review of Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Expert Rev Clin Immunol Source Type: research

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When I worked at Greenpeace for five years before I attended medical school, a popular slogan was, “think globally, act locally.” As I write this blog about climate change and hay fever, I wonder if wiping off my computer that I’ve just sneezed all over due to my seasonal allergies counts as abiding by this aphorism? (Can you clean a computer screen with a tissue?) Come to think of it, my allergies do seem to be worse in recent years. So do those of my patients. It seems as if I’m prescribing nasal steroids and antihistamines, recommending over-the-counter eye drops, and discussing ways to avoid all...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Allergies Environmental health Source Type: blogs
AbstractPurpose of reviewThe aim of this paper is to review and summarise the current knowledge of prevention of house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic rhinitis (AR).Recent findingsAR can be either classified as seasonal/intermittent (for example hay fever occurring summer and autumn) or perennial/persistent (occurring throughout the year). The commonest trigger for seasonal AR is pollen whereas HDMs are the key allergic trigger for perennial AR. HDMs are a recognised indoor allergen that is crucial in the development of AR, asthma, and atopic dermatitis.SummaryPreventive strategies have gained acceptance for the managemen...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Abstract Allergic rhinitis is a common disorder that regularly occurs in children and adolescents. The disease is associated with other allergic diseases, such as asthma, and it carries a heavy burden, with effects on sleep, school performance, and quality of life. Classic symptoms include sneezing, rhinorrhea, nasal obstruction, and nasal itching. When the eyes are involved, the term allergic rhinoconjunctivitis is used. Triggers may include airborne pollens, molds, dust mites, and animals. Skin or blood allergy testing can be a useful diagnostic modality that may guide therapy. Immunotherapy can prevent the deve...
Source: The Medical Clinics of North America - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Pediatr Clin North Am Source Type: research
Allergic rhinitis is a common disorder that regularly occurs in children and adolescents. The disease is associated with other allergic diseases, such as asthma, and it carries a heavy burden, with effects on sleep, school performance, and quality of life. Classic symptoms include sneezing, rhinorrhea, nasal obstruction, and nasal itching. When the eyes are involved, the term allergic rhinoconjunctivitis is used. Triggers may include airborne pollens, molds, dust mites, and animals. Skin or blood allergy testing can be a useful diagnostic modality that may guide therapy. Immunotherapy can prevent the development of further...
Source: Pediatric Clinics of North America - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusions: Application of the mapping function enabled the calculation of QALDs associated with the treatment, with the caveat that data were extrapolated from grass seasonal allergy to tree seasonal allergy. The results showed a significant QALD benefit of the treatment over placebo in treatment of tree pollen-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. PMID: 31352853 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Medical Economics - Category: Health Management Tags: J Med Econ Source Type: research
This article summarizes the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of food allergy and allergic rhinitis.
Source: Otolaryngologic clinics of North America - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionOur study confirmed the equal efficacy and safety profile of both commercial extracts in HDM ‐associated AR patients.
Source: International Forum of Allergy and Rhinology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Standardized house dust mite extract was more effective than non-standardized house dust extract for subcutaneous immunotherapy; however, the establishment of safer methods is warranted. PMID: 31308334 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Arerugi - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Arerugi Source Type: research
ConclusionHLA ‐DRB1 and HLA‐DQB1 gene polymorphism are associated with AIT efficacy in HDM‐sensitive Chinese patients with AR, of which DRB1*03:01; DRB1*04:06 and DQB1*03:02:01; DQB1*05:03:01 may be useful biomarkers of AR patient candidacy for effective AIT.
Source: International Forum of Allergy and Rhinology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
Subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT) is effective for allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, and allergic asthma1. Local reactions are the most common adverse effect associated with SCIT1, though systemic reactions to SCIT (SCITSR) are the most serious adverse effect1. The rate of systemic reactions to SCIT with a conventional dosing schedule is reported to be 0.1-0.2% per injection.1,2 It is generally accepted that the potential benefits of SCIT for select atopic conditions outweigh this risk of SCITSR.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
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