Fibroblast growth factor 21 in lipid metabolism and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Publication date: Available online 13 August 2019Source: Clinica Chimica ActaAuthor(s): Xin Su, Yi Kong, Daoquan PengAbstractNon-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases in several developed countries, ranging from simple non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. Currently, NAFLD has been confirmed to be associated with dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and pre-diabetes, which are always grouped together as metabolic syndrome. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) plays an important role in liver pathophysiology with multiple metabolic functions. Accumulating evidence has shown that FGF21 could directly modulate lipid metabolism and reduce lipid accumulation in hepatocytes through an insulin-independent pathway, thus suppressing the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Furthermore, treatment with FGF21 could obviously reverse NAFLD and synergistically alleviate obesity and counteract insulin resistance. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of FGF21 and the evidence of FGF21 as an important regulator in hepatic lipid metabolism. The mechanisms by which FGF21 affects the pathogenesis of NAFLD would also be proposed for the further understanding of FGF21.
Source: Clinica Chimica Acta - Category: Laboratory Medicine Source Type: research

Related Links:

Conclusion: Liver steatosis and NAFLD with fibrosis were associated with frailty. NAFLD with fibrosis exceeded multimorbidity in the prediction of frailty, suggesting the former as an indicator of metabolic age in PLWH.
Source: AIDS - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: CLINICAL SCIENCE Source Type: research
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is the leading cause of liver disease worldwide with rising rates in parallel to those of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. NAFLD encompasses a wide spectrum of pathology from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis, which are linked to poor outcomes. Studies confirm a significant amount of undiagnosed NAFLD and related fibrosis within the community increasing the overall burden of the disease. NAFLD appears to be more prevalent in certain populations such as those with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Nutritional status is often impaired in people with chronic liver disease. The degree of malnutrition increases with increasing hepatic decompensation and has a significant effect on morbidity and mortality, mainly in those patients with refractory ascites, multiple hospitalizations, cholestatic cirrhosis or chronic persistent alcohol abuse.1 Nevertheless, with the increasing prevalence of obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome some patients with cirrhosis may appear overweight or obese despite being malnourished, especially in the setting of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Hepatology Snapshot Source Type: research
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises fatty liver (steatosis), non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibrosis/cirrhosis and may lead to end-stage liver failure or hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is tightly associated with the most frequent metabolic disorders, such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Both multisystem diseases share several common mechanisms. Alterations of tissue communications include excessive lipid and later cytokine release by dysfunctional adipose tissue, intestinal dysbiosis and ectopic fat deposition in skeletal muscle.
Source: Metabolism - Clinical and Experimental - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Liver cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus (DM) are both common conditions with significant socioeconomic burden and impact on morbidity and mortality. A bidirectional relationship exists between DM and liver cirrhosis regarding both etiology and disease-related complications. Type 2 DM (T2DM) is a well-recognized risk factor for chronic liver disease and vice-versa, DM may develop as a complication of cirrhosis, irrespective of its etiology. Liver transplantation (LT) represents an important treatment option for patients with end-stage liver disease due to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which repr...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of liver disease in the United States, and is estimated to affect up to a quarter of adults in the world. It is defined by excess fat accumulating in the liver and usually occurs in people with obesity, high blood sugars (diabetes), abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels, or high blood pressure. These disorders often run together and as a group are called metabolic syndrome. The “non-alcoholic” part of “non-alcoholic fatty liver disease” is important to distinguish it from alcohol-related liver disease, which can also cause excess liver...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Digestive Disorders Source Type: blogs
AbstractThe growing burden of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) parallels the increasing prevalence of obesity in Asia. The overall prevalence of NAFLD in Asia is now estimated to be 29.6% and may have surpassed that in Western populations. NAFLD increases with increasing age and is closely associated with metabolic syndrome. Ethnic differences exist in the prevalence of NAFLD, but the underlying factors are unclear. There were initial concerns about lean NAFLD being associated with more severe liver disease and increased mortality, but subsequent studies suggested otherwise. Only some NAFLD patients progress to de...
Source: Indian Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
ConclusionsUnder a combination of leflunomide and methotrexate, liver toxicity and, for the first time, thrombotic microangiopathy occurred as side effects. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease may have predisposed for the drug-induced liver toxicity.
Source: Journal of Medical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) figures prominently into the clinical hepatology landscape. NAFLD represents a disease spectrum comprising simple steatosis, steatosis with elevated liver enzymes, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the entity with clear potential for fibrosis progression. Risk factors associated with fibrosis progression in NASH include histologic findings of lobular inflammation and any fibrosis as well as clinical comorbidities that include type 2 diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard in evaluating NASH; however, noninvasive methods are accumula...
Source: Gastroenterology Clinics of North America - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Despite some limitations of our study, such as the small number of patients, and the use of two different methods of evaluation (biopsy and elastography), the data obtained allow us to conclude that of the 39 evaluated cases, 33% (13) presented progression of fibrosis and the total group of 50 patients, 42% had cirrhosis or died due to liver disease. The presence of NASH on hepatic biopsy did not prove to be, in our study, a predictive of the evolution of hepatic fibrosis in the patients.RESUMO CONTEXTO: A doen ça hepática gordurosa não alcoólica vem sendo diagnosticada com frequ&eci...
Source: Arquivos de Gastroenterologia - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
More News: Alcoholism | Cirrhosis | Diabetes | Eating Disorders & Weight Management | Endocrinology | Fatty Liver Disease (FLD) | Insulin | Laboratory Medicine | Liver | Liver Disease | Metabolic Syndrome | Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Diseases (NAFLD) | Obesity | Urology & Nephrology