MRI links high blood pressure with white-matter lesions

MRI scans have linked higher blood pressure with greater accumulation of white-matter...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI shows adverse effects of U.S. embassy mystery PET, MRI show physical activity aids brain health Florbetapir-PET links lack of financial acumen to dementia PET, AI show women's brains age differently than men's MRI links lifestyle factors to stroke, dementia risk
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 2 August 2020Source: Journal of Psychiatric ResearchAuthor(s): Mostafa Alikhani, Alireza Ebrahimi, Vahid Farnia, Habibolah Khazaie, Farnaz Radmehr, Elahe Mohamadi, Omran Davarinejad, Kenneth Dürsteler-MacFarland, Dena Sadeghi Bahmani, Serge Brand
Source: Journal of Psychiatric Research - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Authors: Khan MY, Pandit S, Jayagopal PB, Oomman A, Chockalingam KC, Ramakrishnan A, Mane A, Mehta S, Shah S Abstract Background: Real-world data on the effectiveness of antihypertensive drugs (AHDs) in India is limited. The present study aims to provide updated evidence regarding the effectiveness of olmesartan as monotherapy or in combination with other AHDs in Indian patients with essential hypertension. Methods: Electronic medical record data of adult patients who were diagnosed with essential hypertension (≥140/90 mmHg) and were prescribed olmesartan as mono- or add-on therapy were retrospectively analy...
Source: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India - Category: General Medicine Tags: J Assoc Physicians India Source Type: research
Authors: Singh S, Lohakare AC Abstract Objective: Leptin levels are increased in obesity and have been found to be strongly associated with obesity, increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and morbidity. While, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is measured to predict atherosclerosis in early phase. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the leptin levels and CIMT in overweight and obese individuals. Methods: This cross-sectional study involving 95 subjects, was performed over a period of 1 year in the Department of Medicine, King George's Medical University, Lucknow. Anthropometric measurements...
Source: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India - Category: General Medicine Tags: J Assoc Physicians India Source Type: research
This study delves into the mechanisms by which a short period of fasting can accelerate wound healing. Fasting triggers many of the same cellular stress responses, such as upregulated autophagy, as occur during the practice of calorie restriction. It isn't exactly the same, however, so it is always worth asking whether any specific biochemistry observed in either case does in fact occur in both situations. In particular, the period of refeeding following fasting appears to have beneficial effects that are distinct from those that occur while food is restricted. Multiple forms of therapeutic fasting have been repor...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we examined the benefits of early-onset, lifelong AET on predictors of health, inflammation, and cancer incidence in a naturally aging mouse model. Lifelong, voluntary wheel-running (O-AET; 26-month-old) prevented age-related declines in aerobic fitness and motor coordination vs. age-matched, sedentary controls (O-SED). AET also provided partial protection against sarcopenia, dynapenia, testicular atrophy, and overall organ pathology, hence augmenting the 'physiologic reserve' of lifelong runners. Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by a chronic elevation in 17 of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokin...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
SPECIAL FROM “As many as five million Americans age 65 and older may have Alzheimer’s Disease, and that number is expected to double for every five-year interval beyond age 65.” — the National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke. While Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia, it is not the only form. Risk factors for all kinds of dementia include, age, alcohol use, smoking, atherosclerosis, diabetes, hypertension, and genetics. However, researchers have found some startling connections that show other surprising factors that can heighten your risk: Risk Factor #1: Anticho...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Sixty-nine percent of Americans adults are overweight, and over 35 percent are obese. Obesity increases your risk for numerous conditions including heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and cancer. Sadly, about 3.4 million adults die each year from being overweight or obese. Globally obesity now kills about the same as tobacco and all wars, terrorism and violence. Nearly all people who are overweight already have "pre-diabetes" and have significant risks of disease and death. They just don't know it. When you begin to put on weight, especially lethal belly fat, your biology shifts out of ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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