Sleep deprivation can make you fat, give you a heart attack and change your DNA

A lack of sleep could lead to heart disease, weight gain – and even change the way our DNA behaves. Leading sleep expert Paul Gringras has revealed what happens to our bodies after a poor night's sleep, with higher blood pressure and cholesterol also among the potential consequences of not getting enough rest.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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This study elucidates the potential to use mitochondria from different donors (PAMM) to treat UVR stress and possibly other types of damage or metabolic malfunctions in cells, resulting in not only in-vitro but also ex-vivo applications. Gene Therapy in Mice Alters the Balance of Macrophage Phenotypes to Slow Atherosclerosis Progression https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/07/gene-therapy-in-mice-alters-the-balance-of-macrophage-phenotypes-to-slow-atherosclerosis-progression/ Atherosclerosis causes a sizable fraction of all deaths in our species. It is the generation of fatty deposits in blood vessel...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Looking for clues about the health of your brain? You might want to pay a visit to your eye doctor. Research increasingly links common eye conditions — glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy — to risk for Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. What’s interesting about the study results, says Dr. Albert Hofman, chair of epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, is that cataracts, another common age-related eye condition, had no apparent connection to dementia risk. This gives scientists an important clue about the cause of dementia and Alzheimer&rs...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Eye Health Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Embolism associated with asymptomatic carotid stenosis shows circadian variation with highest rates 4–6 h before midday. This corresponds with peak circadian incidence of stroke and other vascular complications. These and ASED Study results show that monitoring frequency, duration, and time of day are important in ES detection. Introduction Transcranial Doppler (TCD) detected microembolism in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) may help stratify the risk of stroke and other arterial disease complications in persons with advanced (≥60%) asymptomatic carotid stenosis. If so, this techniqu...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusions Aging leads to a progressive decrease in androgen production that, in turn, leads to the development of LOH, defined by significant low T serum levels (in the lowest quartile) in the presence of signs and symptoms of hypogonadism (51). LOH could be due to both testicular and hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction (32), and ED is one of its main symptoms. ED in LOH is linked to increased oxidative stress, subclinical inflammation, and subsequent endothelial dysfunction (101). In elderly men, it has been shown that LOH is also linked to lower cAMP pool and to an alteration of the cGMP signaling pathway. PDE5 gene l...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Shafqat Ahmad1,2,3*, Syeda Sadia Fatima4, Gull Rukh5 and Caren E. Smith6 1Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden 2Preventive Medicine Division, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States 3Department of Nutrition, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States 4Department of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan 5Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden 6Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory, Jean Mayer U. S. Depa...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Lilly Rocha was 37 years old in 2008 when she began having strange symptoms. When people asked her questions, she knew the answers but couldn’t articulate them. A tingling sensation on her left breast became painful. She thought she might have breast cancer, but her doctor assured her she was just experiencing stress from her demanding job. Her symptoms continued to get worse, and doctors continued to dismiss her. Three months later, at work, she became seriously ill. Luckily, her boss recognized the symptoms—chest and jaw pain and numbness in her left hand—and drove her to the nearest emergency room, whe...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized heart health Source Type: news
When Tom Shicowich’s toe started feeling numb in 2010, he brushed it off as a temporary ache. At the time, he didn’t have health insurance, so he put off going to the doctor. The toe became infected, and he got so sick that he stayed in bed for two days with what he assumed was the flu. When he finally saw a doctor, the physician immediately sent Shicowich to the emergency room. Several days later, surgeons amputated his toe, and he ended up spending a month in the hospital to recover. Shicowich lost his toe because of complications of Type 2 diabetes as he struggled to keep his blood sugar under control. He wa...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized health Nutrition Source Type: news
High triglyceride levels are as common as muffin tops and man breasts. You will find a triglyceride level among the four values on any standard cholesterol panel. High triglycerides are either ignored by most doctors or reflexively “treated” with drugs, such as fibrates (Lopid, fenofibrate), prescription fish oil (Lovaza, Vascepa) and, of course, statins. But buried in this single triglyceride value is tremendous insight into diet, metabolic efficiencies, and cardiovascular risk, with control using natural, non-medication means easy to accomplish with absolute NO need for overpriced Big Pharma scam pr...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates grain-free triglycerides undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs
A new study shows heart attacks in pregnant women are on the rise. The good news in a new study by the New York University School of Medicine showing more pregnant women are having heart attacks is that data is being collected about heart disease in women.  If we can clearly define the problem, a solution is much more likely.  Organizations like the American Heart Association have worked hard to make sure women are included in heart disease studies, and studies like this one help decrease the number of deaths due to heart disease. Should pregnant women be worried about heart attacks? As I shared in this interview...
Source: Embrace Your Heart Wellness Initiative - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Heart Disease Risk Factors Heart Health Pregnancy and Heart Health Women's Wellness Source Type: blogs
H3N2: If you ’ve had it, you know how bad it can be. If you don’t, you’ve heard about it and are afraid. Very afraid.We ’re talking about the flu, specifically this flu season’s dominant strain.Others are taking about the flu as well. Physicians at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center and UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica, have been featured in the media, and sought by patients and the public for advice on flu care and prevention — and for good reason.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that flu activity is widespread across the country. The California Department of Publi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
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