An Ebola Drug Trial Ended Early Because It Was So Successful. That Could Change How Doctors Handle Future Outbreaks

A year into an Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), researchers have halted an experimental drug trial there because early results appear so promising. The drugs will be made available to more patients in the DRC, hopefully saving lives as the current outbreak continues. But the decision to end the trial early has implications that go beyond the DRC: it could also change the way infectious disease treatments are studied in years to come. The trial, which began last November and enrolled 681 patients at four sites in the DRC, was meant to test four experimental Ebola therapies: ZMapp (an antibody cocktail from Mapp Biopharmaceutical), remdesivir (an antiviral from Gilead Sciences), mAb114 (a monoclonal antibody licensed by Ridgeback Biotherapeutics), and REGN-EB3 (another antibody cocktail made by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals). After less than a year, the latter two appeared so successful that an independent board overseeing the trial recommended that it end early, according to an announcement from one of the study’s co-sponsors, the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). All future patients in the trial will receive either mAb114 or REGN-EB3, and the drugs will also be available to patients in Ebola treatment centers throughout the DRC. That’s big news not only because it provides hope that more Ebola patients will survive the often-fatal hemorrhagic fever, which has no previously known cure. Beyond that, the stu...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease Source Type: news

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Health workers inside a "CUBE" talk to an Ebola patient, while a nurse consults a chart outside. ALIMA Ebola Treatment Centre, Beni, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Two drugs have been found to successfully treat the Ebola virus. Aid agencies have welcomed the news saying it allows communities to access early treatment. Courtesy: World Health Organisation (WHO)By Issa Sikiti da SilvaCOTONOU, Benin, Aug 20 2019 (IPS) While people in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) are slowly being made aware that scientists have discovered two drugs that are effective in treating Ebola, letting go of the fear and anxiety ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Africa Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Population Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) ebola Source Type: news
Survivors of the first known Ebola outbreak, which occurred in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 1976, may be key to development of vaccines and therapeutic drugs to treat future outbreaks, according to a new study led by researchers at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.UCLA researchers located the 14 Ebola survivors of the 1976 outbreak who, in January 2016, were still living in the same small, remote villages in the forests of the Équateur Province of northwestern Democratic Republic of the Congo. The researchers obtained blood samples and health history reports from them. The data revealed evidence ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Results from a large randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial in Liberia show that two candidate Ebola vaccines pose no major safety concerns and can elicit immune responses by one month after initial vaccination that last for at least one year. The findings, published in NEJM, are based on a study of 1,500 adults that began during the West Africa Ebola outbreak. The trial is being conducted by a US-Liberia clinical research collaboration known as PREVAIL.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
Ebola virus infection can lead to severe hemorrhagic fever, known as Ebola virus disease (EVD), which is often fatal. The Zaire species of Ebola virus (EBOV) was responsible for the largest Ebola outbreak in history, which occurred in 2014. Scientists at the NIAID Vaccine Research Center have developed a human monoclonal neutralizing antibody, mAb114 for treatment and prevention of EBOV infection. Because there are very few treatments available to treat or prevent EBOV infection, there is a great need to develop effective pre- and post- exposure therapeutics before another outbreak occurs.Preclinical efficacy studies demon...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
One person has died from a new outbreak of the Ebola virus in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the World Health Organization confirmed Friday. The country has reported nine suspected cases of the virus and three deaths since April 22, according to WHO communications officer Christoper Lindmeier. Out of the three deaths, one tested positive for Ebola. The #Ebola case in the Democratic Republic of Congo was confirmed by a national reference laboratory in Kinshasa #DRC— WHO (@WHO) May 12, 2017 The cases were discovered in Aketi, a remote region without much access to health facilities, WHO communications offi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Across China, the virus that could spark the next pandemic is already circulating. It’s a bird flu called H7N9, and true to its name, it mostly infects poultry. Lately, however, it’s started jumping from chickens to humans more readily–bad news, because the virus is a killer. During a recent spike, 88% of people infected got pneumonia, three-quarters ended up in intensive care with severe respiratory problems, and 41% died. What H7N9 can’t do–yet–is spread easily from person to person, but experts know that could change. The longer the virus spends in humans, the better the chance that i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized CDC Disease ebola Gates Foundation MERS outbreak pandemic Zika Source Type: news
Editor’s Note: This post reflects on a speech on pandemic preparedness Dr. Fauci gave on January 10, 2017 in Washington, DC, hosted by  The Center for Global Health Science and Security at Georgetown University Medical Center, the Harvard Global Health Institute, and Health Affairs. One of the most important challenges facing the new Administration is preparedness for the pandemic outbreak of an infectious disease. Infectious diseases will continue to pose a significant threat to public health and the economies of countries worldwide. The U.S. government will need to continue its investment to combat these ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Featured Global Health Policy Ebola HIV/AIDS NIH pandemic preparedness Zika Source Type: blogs
Epidemiology&Infection, Volume 144 Issue 12 Epidemiology&Infection publishes original reports and reviews on all aspects of infection in humans and animals. Particular emphasis is given to the epidemiology, prevention and control of infectious diseases. The scope covers the zoonoses, outbreaks, food hygiene, vaccine studies, statistics and the clinical, social and public-health aspects of infectious disease, as well as some tropical infections. It has become the key international periodical in which to find the latest reports on recently discovered infections and new technology. For those concerned with policy and ...
Source: Epidemiology and Infection - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Public health officials are growing more and more concerned about the Zika virus as its true impact in South and Central America becomes clear. In January, the World Health Organization said Zika could be on the verge of spreading throughout the Americas. Health organizations in the U.S. are upping their efforts to develop a vaccine and eradicate the virus, and the White House has asked that money be appropriated to help make this happen. But as certain as death and taxes, Republicans in the House of Representatives have emerged to slow this process to a crawl. GOP lawmakers have met these calls to action with indifference...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
By Timothy Gardner and Jeff Mason WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Top health officials expressed heightened concern on Monday about the threat posed to the United States by the Zika virus, saying the mosquito that spreads it is now present in about 30 states and hundreds of thousands of infections could appear in Puerto Rico. At a White House briefing, they stepped up pressure on the Republican-led Congress to pass approximately $1.9 billion in emergency funding for Zika preparedness that the Obama administration requested in February. "Everything we look at with this virus seems to be a bit scarier than we initially thought,&...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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