Controlling blood pressure may help ward off dementia

More than 100 million Americans are being treated for high blood pressure. A new study finds keeping blood pressure in check could lower the risk of developing dementia. Dr. Tara Narula joins "CBS Evening News" to explain.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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75 million Americans have high blood pressure. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Blood Pressure Dementia subscribers-only Source Type: blogs
A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association has found a link between high blood pressure and dementia
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association has found a link between high blood pressure and dementia. About 1-in-3 American adults have high blood pressure. Dr. Tara Narula joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss the study and share what you can do to stay healthy.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
MRI scans have linked higher blood pressure with greater accumulation of white-matter...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI shows adverse effects of U.S. embassy mystery PET, MRI show physical activity aids brain health Florbetapir-PET links lack of financial acumen to dementia PET, AI show women's brains age differently than men's MRI links lifestyle factors to stroke, dementia risk
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
TUESDAY, Aug. 13, 2019 -- The risk for subsequent dementia is significantly increased for blood pressure patterns of midlife and late-life hypertension as well as midlife hypertension and late-life hypotension; and intensive blood pressure treatment...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
Conditions:   Hypertension;   Dementia Intervention:   Other: Bedtime administration of the participant's pre-existing antihypertensive medications Sponsors:   University of Alberta;   Alberta Innovates Health Solutions;   Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR);   EnACt Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
People between age 54 and 63 with blood pressure readings above 140/90 Hg, and saw their readings drop below 90/60 Hg later in life, have an increased risk of dementia, according to a study published Tuesday.
Source: Health News - UPI.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
TUESDAY, Aug. 13, 2019 -- Staying sharp and warding off dementia might rely, in part, on doing your best to keep high blood pressure at bay. So finds a new study that suggests strict control of hypertension may help prevent dementia. In the study,...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
Conditions:   Hypertension;   Dementia Intervention:   Other: Bedtime administration of the participant's pre-existing antihypertensive medications Sponsors:   University of Alberta;   Alberta Innovates Health Solutions;   Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR);   EnACt Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
ConclusionsVascular risk factors and sociodemographic characteristics were the best predictors of cognitive outcomes in a sample of late-onset epilepsy with cerebral small-vessel disease. Epilepsy did not show influence on cognitive function. Longitudinal studies are necessary to clarify the relationship between vascular risk factors and epilepsy on progression of cognitive deterioration in patients with late-onset epilepsy.“This article is part of the Special Issue “Seizures &Stroke””
Source: Epilepsy and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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