Study: Eating More Gluten Early In Life Could Raise Child ’ s Risk Of Celiac Disease

(CNN) — Bad news for lovers of bread, pasta and baked goods: Eating lots of gluten-heavy foods from a young age could eventually lead to gluten intolerance. A study published Tuesday in the journal JAMA suggests that eating higher-than-normal levels of gluten during the first five years of life can increase a child’s likelihood of developing celiac disease, a digestive disorder that damages the small intestine. Higher gluten intake was associated with a 6.1% increased risk of celiac disease autoimmunity, an immunological response to gluten, and a 7.2% increased risk of celiac disease per each additional gram or gluten per day, according to the study. Researchers evaluated more than 6,600 newborns in the United States, Finland, Germany and Sweden born between 2004 to 2010. All of the children carried a genotype associated with Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. Every few months, the study’s authors recorded the children’s gluten intake until the age of 5 and compared the levels to reference amounts of gluten intake in healthy children at each age. Over the course of the study, 1,216 of the children — nearly 20% — developed celiac disease autoimmunity, the first sign of the body’s negative response to the protein, said study author Carin Andrén Aronsson, study manager at the Unit for Diabetes &Celiac Disease at Lund University in Sweden. Another 450 participants developed celiac disease, about 7%. Most of the diagnoses occur...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Gluten Source Type: news

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Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Profound and debilitating fatigue is the most common complaint reported among individuals with autoimmune disease, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, chronic fatigue syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis. Fatigue is multi-faceted and broadly defined, which makes understanding the cause of its manifestations especially difficult in conditions with diverse pathology including autoimmune diseases. In general, fatigue is defined by debilitating periods of exhaustion that interfere with normal activities. The severity and duration of fatigue episodes vary, but fatigue can cau...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Purpose of review Sarcoidosis is an immune-mediated disease of unknown cause. Immune-mediated diseases appear to cluster in patients and in families. We review what is known on this topic for sarcoidosis, and what factors may underlie disease clustering. Recent findings In populations of patients with sarcoidosis, relative risk estimates of Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, autoimmune hepatitis, ankylosing spondylitis, multiple sclerosis (MS), celiac disease, autoimmune thyroid disease, and ulcerative colitis, varied between 2.1 and 11.6. In relatives of patients with sarcoidosis, relative risk es...
Source: Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: SARCOIDOSIS: Edited by Jan C. Grutters and Marc A. Judson Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our study showed a higher incidence of autoimmune diseases in TS, which is in line with the literature; however, the impact of iXq, or spontaneous / inducted puberty was not confirmed.
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs), including Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT) and Graves’ disease (GD), tend to aggregate with other non-thyroidal autoimmune diseases (NTADs). Aim of this Mini-review is to report the most recent insights concerning the clustering of NTADs in pediatric patients with either HT or GD, the pathophysiology of AITDs and the metamorphic thyroid autoimmunity. A systematic literature research of the last fifteen years, according to EQUATOR statement, was carried out through MEDLINE via PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, based on the following ...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Conclusion: The prevalence of biopsy-proven CD among T1DM patients in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (12.0%) was double the global prevalence (6.0%), and much higher than the normal Saudi population (1.4%). The female-to-male ratio (2:1) of CD patients in T1DM was the same as in the normal population in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. No significant difference was detected between the reported serologically-proven rates and the reported biopsy-proven rates (p=0.093). PMID: 31287124 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Saudi Medical Journal - Category: Middle East Health Tags: Saudi Med J Source Type: research
AbstractSelective immunoglobulin A deficiency (SIgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency, defined as an isolated deficiency of IgA (less than 0.07  g/L). Although the majority of people born with IgA deficiency lead normal lives without significant pathology, there is nonetheless a significant association of IgA deficiency with mucosal infection, increased risks of atopic disease, and a higher prevalence of autoimmune disease. To explain thes e phenomena, we have performed an extensive literature review to define the geoepidemiology of IgA deficiency and particularly the relative risks for developing systemic...
Source: Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Indian Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Authors: Vorobjova T, Tagoma A, Oras A, Alnek K, Kisand K, Talja I, Uibo O, Uibo R Abstract Cytokines play a pivotal role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis inducing pro- or anti-inflammatory response and mucosal barrier function in celiac disease (CD) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). We aimed to compare the levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in CD patients without and with coexisting T1D, as well as to evaluate its association with the presence of enteroviruses (EV), regulatory T cells (Tregs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in small bowel mucosa. Altogether, 72 patients (median age 10.1 years) who had ...
Source: Journal of Immunology Research - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: J Immunol Res Source Type: research
In the United States and other developed countries, we have seen a shift over the past several decades in the types of illness people struggle with. Public health campaigns around vaccination, sanitation, and judicious use of antibiotics have largely eradicated many infectious illnesses. As the nature of disease has shifted to inflammatory conditions, we’ve seen a striking increase in allergy and autoimmune conditions such as diabetes, obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis. The microbiome — the varied and teeming colonies of gut bacteria inside of us — may be helping ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Digestive Disorders Family Planning and Pregnancy Inflammation Probiotics Source Type: blogs
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