A Cure for Ebola? Two New Treatments Prove Highly Effective in Congo

The therapies saved roughly 90 percent of the patients who were newly infected, a turning point in the decades-long fight against the virus.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Ebola Virus Epidemics ZMapp (Drug) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases World Health Organization Fauci, Anthony S Congo, Democratic Republic of (Congo-Kinshasa) Source Type: news

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The therapies saved roughly 90 percent of the patients who received them early in the course of infection. Doctors hope patients will seek out the cures, ending the outbreak.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Ebola Virus Epidemics ZMapp (Drug) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases World Health Organization Fauci, Anthony S Congo, Democratic Republic of (Congo-Kinshasa) Source Type: news
Congo results show good survival rates for patients treated quickly with antibodiesEbola can no longer be called an incurable disease, scientists have said, after two of four drugs being trialled in themajor outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo were found to have significantly reduced the death rate.ZMapp, used during the massive Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea, has been dropped along with Remdesivir after two monoclonal antibodies, which block the virus, had substantially more effect, said the World Health Organization and the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which w...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Ebola Democratic Republic of the Congo Africa World news Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Pharmaceuticals industry World Health Organization Source Type: news
African green monkeys survived infection with the Nipah virus after they received remdesivir. The virus, a pandemic threat carried by bats, has killed dozens of people in Asia.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Nipah Virus Ebola Virus Bats MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) Epidemics National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Gilead Sciences Inc Science Translational Medicine (Journal) Bangladesh Malaysia India Source Type: news
Jeffrey G. Shaffer1*, Frances J. Mather1, Mamadou Wele2, Jian Li1, Cheick Oumar Tangara2, Yaya Kassogue2, Sudesh K. Srivastav1, Oumar Thiero2, Mahamadou Diakite2, Modibo Sangare2, Djeneba Dabitao2, Mahamoudou Toure2, Abdoulaye A. Djimde2, Sekou Traore2, Brehima Diakite2, Mamadou B. Coulibaly2, Yaozhong Liu1, Michelle Lacey3, John J. Lefante1, Ousmane Koita2, John S. Schieffelin4, Donald J. Krogstad1 and Seydou O. Doumbia2 1Department of Global Biostatistics and Data Science, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States 2Faculty of Medicine and Odontostomatology, Un...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Early during the West African Ebola epidemic, scientists speculated that the genetic diversity of the Makona strain of virus (EBOV-Makona) would result in more severe disease and more transmissibility than prior strains. However NIH scientists have determined that certain mutations stabilized early during the epidemic and did not alter Ebola disease presentation or outcome. Their work offers evidence to support previous findings that the diversity of EBOV-Makona did not significantly impact the course of disease.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
Survivors of the first known Ebola outbreak, which occurred in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 1976, may be key to development of vaccines and therapeutic drugs to treat future outbreaks, according to a new study led by researchers at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.UCLA researchers located the 14 Ebola survivors of the 1976 outbreak who, in January 2016, were still living in the same small, remote villages in the forests of the Équateur Province of northwestern Democratic Republic of the Congo. The researchers obtained blood samples and health history reports from them. The data revealed evidence ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Across China, the virus that could spark the next pandemic is already circulating. It’s a bird flu called H7N9, and true to its name, it mostly infects poultry. Lately, however, it’s started jumping from chickens to humans more readily–bad news, because the virus is a killer. During a recent spike, 88% of people infected got pneumonia, three-quarters ended up in intensive care with severe respiratory problems, and 41% died. What H7N9 can’t do–yet–is spread easily from person to person, but experts know that could change. The longer the virus spends in humans, the better the chance that i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized CDC Disease ebola Gates Foundation MERS outbreak pandemic Zika Source Type: news
Epidemiology&Infection, Volume 144 Issue 12 Epidemiology&Infection publishes original reports and reviews on all aspects of infection in humans and animals. Particular emphasis is given to the epidemiology, prevention and control of infectious diseases. The scope covers the zoonoses, outbreaks, food hygiene, vaccine studies, statistics and the clinical, social and public-health aspects of infectious disease, as well as some tropical infections. It has become the key international periodical in which to find the latest reports on recently discovered infections and new technology. For those concerned with policy and ...
Source: Epidemiology and Infection - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Epidemiology &Infection, Volume 144 Issue 07 Epidemiology &Infection publishes original reports and reviews on all aspects of infection in humans and animals. Particular emphasis is given to the epidemiology, prevention and control of infectious diseases. The scope covers the zoonoses, outbreaks, food hygiene, vaccine studies, statistics and the clinical, social and public-health aspects of infectious disease, as well as some tropical infections. It has become the key international periodical in which to find the latest reports on recently discovered infections and new technology. For those concerned with policy an...
Source: Epidemiology and Infection - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Epidemiology &Infection, Volume 144 Issue 06 Epidemiology &Infection publishes original reports and reviews on all aspects of infection in humans and animals. Particular emphasis is given to the epidemiology, prevention and control of infectious diseases. The scope covers the zoonoses, outbreaks, food hygiene, vaccine studies, statistics and the clinical, social and public-health aspects of infectious disease, as well as some tropical infections. It has become the key international periodical in which to find the latest reports on recently discovered infections and new technology. For those concerned with policy an...
Source: Epidemiology and Infection - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
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