Eating Pathology After Bariatric Surgery: an Updated Review of the Recent Literature

AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe goal of this paper was to extend the prior literature on eating pathology following bariatric surgery by highlighting themes in data published over the past 3  years and identifying limitations and future directions for research.Recent FindingsChanges in eating pathology after bariatric surgery remain consistent with previous research. Specifically, diagnostic prevalence rates and incidence of related behaviors generally decrease following surgery. However, some research supports that these factors increase and/or remit over time following surgery, and that they subsequently have a negative impact on weight loss outcomes.SummaryWhile recent findings have extended knowledge on eating pathology following bariatric surgery, the overall body of literature is still relatively limited. Additional research is needed, including work focusing on the standardization of eating pathology definitions, development/validation of standardized eating pathology instruments for bariatric surgery patients, and predictors of risk for continued or new onset eating pathology following surgery.
Source: Current Psychiatry Reports - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

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Authors: Janik MR, Rogula TG, Mustafa RR, Saleh AA, Abbas M, Khaitan L Abstract Introduction: Despite the clinical benefits of bariatric surgery, some patients have experienced disappointment with their weight loss. Setting realistic expectations is the key to success. Aim: To develop a specific prediction calculator to estimate the expected body mass index (BMI) at 1 year after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Material and methods: A retrospective analysis was performed to study 211 patients after primary LSG. Nine baseline variables were analyzed. Least angle regression (LARS) was employed for varia...
Source: Videosurgery and Other Miniinvasive Techniques - Category: Surgery Tags: Wideochir Inne Tech Maloinwazyjne Source Type: research
Authors: Sekuła M, Boniecka I, Paśnik K Abstract Eating is a basic human physiological need which is necessary to keep the body alive. Eating disorders are diagnosed when eating (or not eating) and associated body weight gain anxiety become the main interest of an individual and all other spheres of life depend on it. Bulimia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder which is more and more commonly diagnosed in patients suffering from obesity and in patients after surgical treatment of obesity. In patients eligible for bariatric surgery this disorder should be diagnosed appropriately early and treated successfully before...
Source: Videosurgery and Other Miniinvasive Techniques - Category: Surgery Tags: Wideochir Inne Tech Maloinwazyjne Source Type: research
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is known to increase risk for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis due to hyperoxaluria; however, nephrolithiasis rates after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) are not well described. Our objective was to determine the rate of nephrolithiasis after LRYGB versus LSG.
Source: American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Functional ability is often impaired as a direct consequence of severe obesity. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original articles Source Type: research
With the advent of the obesity epidemic and the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques, Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (LRYGB) has emerged and remained one of the most effective and common bariatric operations of the past two decades [1-4]. There was a time during the evolution of this procedure when the sheer excitement of completing such a highly complex procedure laparoscopically offered some surgeons a license to cut corners in the name of efficiency. After all, the mantra of “economy of motion” was taught to many of us by those very pioneers who advanced the technical elements of the operation.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Conditions:   Obesity, Morbid;   Bariatric Surgery;   Adolescent;   Young Adult;   Drug Therapy Interventions:   Drug: Phentermine;   Drug: Immediate Release Topiramate;   Drug: Placebo for Phentermine;   Drug: Placebo for Immediate Release Topiramate Sponsors:   Jaime Moore, MD MPH;   National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK);   University of Colorado- Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute;   University of Colorado- Nutrition ...
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Conditions:   Obesity, Morbid;   Bariatric Surgery;   Adolescent;   Young Adult;   Drug Therapy Interventions:   Drug: Phentermine;   Drug: Immediate Release Topiramate;   Drug: Placebo for Phentermine;   Drug: Placebo for Immediate Release Topiramate Sponsors:   Jaime Moore;   National Institutes of Health (NIH);   University of Colorado- Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute;   University of Colorado- Nutrition Obesity Research Center Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
GENERAL PURPOSE To provide information on obesity, bariatric surgery, and the nutrient deficiency-related dermatoses that may result from these surgeries. TARGET AUDIENCE This continuing education activity is intended for physicians, physician assistants, NPs, and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to: 1. Examine issues related to obesity and bariatric surgery. 2. Identify the sources and role of specific nutrients. 3. Recognize the clinical signs and symptoms of nutrient deficiency f...
Source: Advances in Skin and Wound Care - Category: Dermatology Tags: FEATURES: CLINICAL MANAGEMENT EXTRA Source Type: research
Wolf et al.,[1] make a reasonable case that a low calorie diet for two weeks prior to various bariatric operations leads to favorable intraoperative histologic liver changes. This supports the findings of several prior publications that have noted decreases in liver size, radiologic fat content, liver enzymes and levels of hepatic inflammation on pathologic evaluation after weight loss [2-4]. The current manuscript also suggests that preoperative weight loss in these patients predicted improved 6-month postoperative weight loss, although the study size was too small for this to be the leading conclusion of the paper.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
I would like to congratulate Pechman DM, et al. on their contribution to the pertinent area of bariatric surgery in elderly patients. Many articles have outlined the safety of both Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy in geriatric patients. Here, the authors use American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) data to estimate the morbidity and mortality in patients over the age of 70 who had bariatric surgery.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
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