Seroepidemiological survey of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever among high-risk groups in the west of Iran.

Seroepidemiological survey of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever among high-risk groups in the west of Iran. J Vector Borne Dis. 2019 Apr-Jun;56(2):174-177 Authors: Shahbazi N, Firouz SK, Karimi M, Mostafavi E Abstract Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a zoonotic viral haemorrhagic disease. This disease is more common in people who work with animals infected with CCHF virus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the CCHF exposure in high-risk occupational groups in Kurdistan Province in the west of Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 in three counties of Kurdistan Province, viz. Sanandaj, Marivan and Sarvabad. About 50 butchers and slaughterhouse workers, 50 hunters, 50 health care workers and 100 subjects referred to clinical laboratories were sampled and examined for the diagnosis of IgG antibodies against the CCHF using ELISA method. The serum sample of one of the butchers and slaughterhouse workers was positive for CCHF virus. No positive case was found in any other studied groups. The study findings indicate that although CCHF is an endemic disease in different parts of Iran, there is a low rate of seropositivity among high-risk occupations in the west of Iran. Therefore, it is not probably a serious public health problem in this area. PMID: 31397395 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Vector Borne Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: J Vector Borne Dis Source Type: research

Related Links:

In conclusion, climate appeared to affect the number of CCHF patients. We believe that the number of patients presenting to the hospital with CCHF could be predicted by taking into account climatic properties of the places where CCHF has been recorded, along with undertaking necessary measures. PMID: 31168176 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Acta Clinica Croatica - Category: General Medicine Tags: Acta Clin Croat Source Type: research
Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne Nairovirus that causes severe hemorrhagic fever with a mortality rate of up to 30% in certain outbreaks worldwide. The virus has wide endemic distribution. There is no effective antiviral therapeutic or FDA approved vaccine for this zoonotic viral illness. The multifunctional CCHFV nucleocapsid protein (N protein) plays a crucial role in the establishment of viral infection and is an important structural component of the virion. Here we show that CCHFV N protein has a distant RNA-binding site in the stalk domain that specifically recognizes the vRNA panhandle, f...
Source: Journal of Biological Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Molecular Bases of Disease Source Type: research
ConclusionAccording to the results of our study, it can be suggested that radiological examination in lungs should be performed primarily with CXR and pulmonary involvement (pleural effusion and consolidation) affects survival in CCHF negatively.
Source: La Radiologia Medica - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is a highly infectious zoonotic disease of humans transmitted by Hyalomma ticks. Earlier studies have shown CCHF seroprevalence in livestock throughout India, yet sporadic o...
Source: BMC Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
by Jessica R. Spengler, Agustin Estrada-Pe ña Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne zoonotic agent that is maintained in nature in an enzootic vertebrate-tick-vertebrate cycle.Hyalomma genus ticks have been implicated as the main CCHFV vector and are key in maintaining silent endemic foci. However, what contributes to their central role in CCHFV ecology is unclear. To assess the significance of host preferences of ticks in CCHFV ecology, we performed comparative analyses of hosts exploited by 133 species of ticks; these species represent 5 genera with reported geographical distribution over ...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
In conclusion, as our country is endemic for both brucellosis and CCHF, it is important to consider both infections in the differential diagnosis. Physicians should keep in mind that, likewise in our case, coinfection of brucellosis and CCHF can be detected. PMID: 27175506 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Mikrobiyoloji Bulteni - Category: Microbiology Tags: Mikrobiyol Bul Source Type: research
ConclusionRegular controls and monitoring of livestock to reduce the dispersion of ticks and providing information to those involved in high‐risk occupations are urgently required.
Source: Tropical Medicine and International Health - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a zoonotic viral infection which is transmitted primarily through contact with ticks. It is endemic in the Middle East, southeastern Europe, Asia, and Africa. In Turkey, it is seen in a wide region encompassing south of the Black Sea coastal line and middle and eastern Anatolia [1]. The disease is caused by a RNA virus in the Bunyaviridae family and Nairovirus genus. Signs and symptoms of the disease include high fever, malaise, headache, diffuse myalgia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and bleeding through the skin and mucosal surfaces.
Source: Journal of Clinical Virology - Category: Virology Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionRegular controls and monitoring of livestock to reduce the dispersion of ticks and providing information to those involved in high‐risk occupations are urgently required.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Tropical Medicine and International Health - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a life-threatening tick-borne infection in Africa and Eurasia. Although knowledge of epidemiology is increasing, the global extent and risk of infection is not well described. A niche-modeling framework has been used to map the global distribution of risk for CCHF based on analysis of human CCHF reports. The new risk maps provide a valuable starting point for understanding the zoonotic niche of CCHF. Migratory birds travelling across continents may also introduce CCHF to new areas through attached ticks. There is an overlap between CCHF endemic areas and breeding and wintering grou...
Source: Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Tags: COMMENTARY Source Type: research
More News: Congo Health | Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever | Endemics | Health Management | Infectious Diseases | International Medicine & Public Health | Iran Health | Middle East Health | Occupational Health | Study | Zoonoses