Hysterectomy provides benefit in health-related quality of life: A ten-year follow-up study

ConclusionsHysterectomy provided long-term improvement in HRQoL, especially in the women with myoma, AUB, and those with endometriosis.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

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ConclusionMorcellation of nonmalignant tissue is not without consequence. Pathology confirmed endometriosis was documented for the first time in 20.4% of patients who underwent a second surgery. This finding raises the suspicion that morcellation and dispersion of the uterine specimen may be associated in the development of endometriosis.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
ConclusionTo conclude, preoperative embolization of the arteriovenous shunt improves surgery, avoiding excessive bleeding and permitting easier radical hysterectomy for deep pelvic endometriosis. Similar cases have been published [1], but to our knowledge, our video is the first regarding this subject. It appears that embolization can fail, but hysterectomy remains the gold standard treatment [2].
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 28 August 2018Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive GynecologyAuthor(s): Nancy T. Nguyen, Maqdooda Merchant, Miranda L. Ritterman Weintraub, Chelsea Salyer, Joanna Poceta, Lucero Diaz, Eve F. ZaritskyAbstractStudy objective: To investigate rates of utilization of alternative treatments before hysterectomy for benign gynecologic indications within a large integrated health care system.Design: (Study Design Classification II-2) Retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent hysterectomies for benign gynecologic conditions between 2012 and 2014. From an eligible cohort of 6,892 hystere...
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Conclusions: Laparoscopic ureteroneocystostomy with or without bladder flap (Boari) provides good functional outcomes with excellent success rates and minimal morbidity comparable to open surgery in patients with ureteric stricture.
Source: Urology Annals - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionMorcellation of nonmalignant tissue is not without consequence. Pathology confirmed endometriosis was documented for the first time in 20.4% of patients who underwent a second surgery. This finding raises the suspicion that morcellation and dispersion of the uterine specimen may be associated in the development of endometriosis.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
CONCLUSION(s) Morcellation of non-malignant tissue is not without consequence. Pathology confirmed endometriosis was documented for the first time in 20.4% of patients who underwent a second surgery. This finding raises the suspicion that morcellation and dispersion of the uterine specimen may be associated in the development of endometriosis.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: With a committed patient, adequate planning, and knowledge of the potential intraoperative complications, regional anesthesia is an option for select women undergoing laparoscopic hysterectomy. PMID: 29742667 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
A 49-year-old underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy for dysmenorrhea, fibroids and heavy menstrual bleeding. Past surgical history was significant for laparotomy for excision of stage IV endometriosis. Intraoperatively, lysis of adhesions was completed using a bipolar instrument, sharp dissection and ultrasonic instrument. Her 14-week sized uterus was removed via mini-laparotomy. On routine cystoscopy following the procedure, a thermal injury measuring 1 cm in width was noted at the dome of the bladder (Figure 1).
Source: The Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Images in Gynecological Surgery Source Type: research
The post What a pain! – Lisa’s story appeared first on Hysterectomy Association. I knew I had endometriosis as it had a laparoscopy that identified this in my mid thirties as part of infertility investigations. I tried ICSI once after that and paid privately but we were unsuccessful in having a baby. We carried on ‘leaving it up to nature’ for many years after that but nothing happened. At the age of forty three we decided that we wouldn’t actively pursue my getting pregnant any more and put the idea to bed – my husband has a 17 yr old daughter from a previous marriage and she lives...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Your Stories endometriosis Source Type: news
A 41-year-old woman presented to our clinic with left-sided lower abdominal pain and irregular episodes of reddish-brown vaginal discharge at 6  months after undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oopherectomy for severe pelvic endometriosis with bilateral ovarian endometriomas. The bleeding was irregular and unpredictable, and there was no monthly pattern. Her medical history disclosed 2 previous caesarean sect ion deliveries. Abdominal examination was unremarkable. Speculum examination revealed a blackish-brown discharge at the vaginal vault and a minimal amount of granulation-appearing tissue at the vault.
Source: The Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Images in Gynecologic Surgery Source Type: research
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