Vitamin B12 deficiency symptoms: The sign in your eyes that could signal a lack of B12

VITAMIN B12 deficiency could lead to a host of health problems including feeling very tired, depressed and weak. Your eyes could hold a warning sign that you may need more of the vitamin, and could be a symptom of the condition. What symptom should you look out for?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Good sources of vitamin B12 include fish, poultry, eggs and low-fat milk. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Depression Source Type: blogs
Restorative proctocolectomy (RP) is a common surgical procedure utilized in the management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), primarily ulcerative colitis (UC). This procedure involves removal of the colon, and the formation of a pouch from the distal portion of the ileum, the primary site for absorption of vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 deficiency has been linked to fatigue, depression, memory loss, weakness, neuropathy, and altered bowel habits. In RP, surgical manipulation of the ileum, an altered microbiota, and pouchitis may potentially impair vitamin B12 status.
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Disease Complications Source Type: research
This study aimed to investigate folate, vitamin B12, vitamin B6, and riboflavin in relation to depression and anxiety in aging and also considered the role of fortified foods as a means of optimizing B-vitamin status and potentially reducing the risk of these mental health disorders.
Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Original Study Source Type: research
Health, weight, and appearance are transformed by living the Wheat Belly lifestyle. You can see it on the face with reduced puffiness and edema and smoother skin. You can see it on the waistline as inflammatory visceral fat recedes. You can perceive it as increased energy, reduced depression and anxiety, reduction or elimination of irritable bowel syndrome and acid reflux symptoms, reduced joint pain, reversal of leg/ankle edema, and in so many other ways. But how about blood measures of health? You can witness the transformations there, too. And the transformations you see in blood markers of health can be just as dramati...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates cholesterol Inflammation triglycerides Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs
We present the case of an 80-year-old woman, single with no children, who lived alone, and, up until presentation, was able to perform activities of daily living self-sufficiently. She reported to have the support of friends and neighbors, and she lived in the small community of São Miguel Island, Azores, Portugal. She had completed two years of college before dropping out during her third year, and her last job was as an elder care-worker. She had no personal or family psychiatric antecedents and no history of alcohol or illicit drug addictions. The patient was diagnosed with DM2 two years previously and was treate...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Case Report Current Issue acute confusional state delirium diabetes hyperglycemia psychosis Source Type: research
SYMPTOMS of a vitamin B12 deficiency can be serious, including disturbed vision, memory loss, depression and problems with balance. Here ’s how to find out if you’re lacking in the essential vitamin.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Abstract Homocysteine (Hcy) is thiol group containing the amino acid, which naturally occurs in all humans. Hcy is degraded in the body through two metabolic pathways, while a minor part is excreted through kidneys. The chemical reactions that are necessary for degradation of Hcy require the presence of the folic acid, vitamins B6 and B12. Consequently, the level of the total Hcy in the serum is influenced by the presence or absence of these vitamins. An elevated level of the Hcy, hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) and homocystinuria are connected with occlusive artery disease, especially in the brain, the heart, and the...
Source: Current Medicinal Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Curr Med Chem Source Type: research
In this study published in July 2017, researchers looked at the vitamin D levels and cognitive function in patients who experienced psychosis. They found an association between low levels of vitamin D and decreased processing speed and verbal fluency. The authors suggested the next step should be randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation in those with psychosis and vitamin D deficiency. Another study, published in Psychiatry Research in August 2017, looked at whether vitamin B12, homocysteine folic acid, and vitamin D might be connected to childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Fifty-two children an...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Brain and Behavior Health-related Memory and Perception Mental Health and Wellness Brain Disorder Mental Illness Vitamin D Vitamin Deficiency Source Type: blogs
Vegetarians and vegans are more vulnerable to vitamin B12 deficiency with severe risks of megaloblastic anemia, cognitive decline, neuropathy, and depression. An easy and simple method of supplementation consists of taking one weekly dosage of 2000  μg. However, single large oral doses of vitamin B12 are poorly absorbed. The present research evaluates the ability of two different sublingual dosages of vitamin B12 (350 μg/week vs 2000 μg/week) in improving cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12) nutritional status in vegans and vegetarians with a ma rginal deficiency.
Source: Clinical Nutrition - Category: Nutrition Authors: Tags: Randomized Control Trials Source Type: research
Vegetarians and vegans are more vulnerable to vitamin B12 deficiency with severe risks of megaloblastic anemia, cognitive decline, neuropathy, and depression. An easy and simple method of supplementation consists of taking one weekly dosage of 2000 μg. However, single large oral doses of vitamin B12 are poorly absorbed. The present research evaluates the ability of two different sublingual dosages of vitamin B12 (350 μg/week vs. 2000 μg/week) in improving cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12) nutritional status in vegans and vegetarians with a margi nal deficiency.
Source: Clinical Nutrition - Category: Nutrition Authors: Tags: Randomized Control Trials Source Type: research
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