On the immunoregulatory role of statins in multiple sclerosis: the effects on Th17 cells

AbstractStatins, the cholesterol-lowering drugs, also possess immunomodulatory properties, affecting among others T cell activation and differentiation, antigen presentation, and regulatory T cell (Tregs) maintenance and differentiation. Their effects on autoagression have led investigators to assess their clinical significance in autoimmune disease, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic progressive demyelinating disease of autoimmune nature. The dysregulated immunity noted in MS features a profound shift from Tregs dominance to Th17 cell superiority. In this review, we discuss the immunobiological basis of statins, their role in autoimmunity related to MS, and the data from experimental models and human studies on their effect on Th17 cells.
Source: Immunologic Research - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

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Abstract While Treg cells are responsible for self-tolerance and immune homeostasis, pathogenic autoreactive Th17 cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokines that lead to tissue damage associated with autoimmunity, as observed in multiple sclerosis. Therefore, the immunological balance between Th17 and Treg cells may represent a promising option for immune therapy. Statin drugs are used to treat dyslipidemia; however, besides their effects on preventing cardiovascular diseases, statins also have anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we investigated the role of pitavastatin on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE...
Source: International Immunopharmacology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Int Immunopharmacol Source Type: research
Joseph D. Romano1,2,3,4 and Nicholas P. Tatonetti1,2,3,4* 1Department of Biomedical Informatics, Columbia University, New York, NY, United States 2Department of Systems Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY, United States 3Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY, United States 4Data Science Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY, United States The discovery of new pharmaceutical drugs is one of the preeminent tasks—scientifically, economically, and socially—in biomedical research. Advances in informatics and computational biology have increased productivity at many stag...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of TolDCs induced by atorvastatin pulsed with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35–55 peptide (MOG35–55) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice established by MOG35–55 immunization and to investigate the potential effects on Th17/Treg balance in the murine model of multiple sclerosis. Our results showed that atorvastatin-treated dendritic cells maintained a steady semimature phenotype with a low level of costimulatory molecules and proinflammatory cytokines. Upon an intraperitoneal injection into experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice,...
Source: NeuroReport - Category: Neurology Tags: Cellular, Molecular and Developmental Neuroscience Source Type: research
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 29331024 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Immunology Source Type: research
In conclusion, I would never advise John McCain and his family, or any other GBM patient, as to which of these treatments—or which combination of treatments—they should use. I hope they will learn about all of them, and decide on their own which one or ones they would like to try. I would also encourage them to do their own research, or to hire a researcher with experience in finding sensible, science-based, cutting-edge treatments. I am very worried that they will not know about these treatments, and others like them, and will just use the standard of care. That would be a shame. It might also be a death sent...
Source: HONEST MEDICINE: My Dream for the Future - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: blogs
This study featured two independent experiments. The first established the safety of administering a therapeutic gene delivery vector, BNP116, created from an inactivated virus over three months, into 48 pigs without heart failure through the coronary arteries via catheterization using echocardiography. The second experiment examined the efficacy of the treatment in 13 pigs with severe heart failure induced by mitral regurgitation. Six pigs received the gene and 7 received a saline solution. The researchers determined that the gene therapy was safe and significantly reversed heart failure by 25 percent in the left v...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, I would never advise John McCain and his family, or any other GBM patient, as to which of these treatments—or which combination of treatments—they should use. I hope they will learn about all of them, and decide on their own which one or ones they would like to try. I would also encourage them to do their own research, or to hire a researcher with experience in finding sensible, science-based, cutting-edge treatments. I am very worried that they will not know about these treatments, and others like them, and will just use the standard of care. That would be a shame. It might also be a death sentence.
Source: HONEST MEDICINE: My Dream for the Future - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion Recent evidence shows changes in frequency and function of Th22 and its cytokine IL-22 in patients with MS, which suggests a potential relationship between Th22 cells, IL-22 levels, and the development and disease course of MS and its response to treatment. How Th22 cells and IL-22 levels affect the disease course of MS requires further elucidation. Additional studies on the immunopathogenesis of MS, specifically the roles Th22 cells and IL-22 cytokines may play in disease progression, are warranted and may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies for treating neuro-inflammatory diseases, such as MS...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Demyelinating Disease Genetics Multiple Sclerosis Neurology Review interleukin-22 T helper 22 Source Type: research
This study teaches us that poor wound healing and wrinkling and sagging that occur in aging skin share similar mechanisms." Reduced cell cohesiveness of outgrowths from eccrine sweat glands delays wound closure in elderly skin Human skin heals more slowly in aged vs. young adults, but the mechanism for this delay is unclear. In humans, eccrine sweat glands (ESGs) and hair follicles underlying wounds generate cohesive keratinocyte outgrowths that expand to form the new epidermis. Our results confirm that the outgrowth of cells from ESGs is a major feature of repair in young skin. Strikingly, in aged s...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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