Computational framework for predictive PBPK-PD-Tox simulations of opioids and antidotes

AbstractThe primary goal of this work was to develop a computational tool to enable personalized prediction of pharmacological disposition and associated responses for opioids and antidotes. Here we present a computational framework for physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling of an opioid (morphine) and an antidote (naloxone). At present, the model is solely personalized according to an individual ’s mass. These PK models are integrated with a minimal pharmacodynamic model of respiratory depression induction (associated with opioid administration) and reversal (associated with antidote administration). The model was developed and validated on human data for IV administration of morphine and naloxone. The model can be further extended to consider different routes of administration, as well as to study different combinations of opioid receptor agonists and antagonists. This work provides the framework for a tool that could be used in model-based management of pain, pharmacological treat ment of opioid addiction, appropriate use of antidotes for opioid overdose and evaluation of abuse deterrent formulations.
Source: Journal of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research

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The opioid crisis is known as the health crisis surrounding prescription, and nonprescription, opioid drugs. The overdose and death rates of opioids are climbing exponentially and the use of the drug is more rampant now than ever. How Did the Opioid Crisis Begin? In the late 1990s, pharmaceutical companies reassured the medical community that patients would not become addicted to prescription opioid pain relievers, and healthcare providers began to prescribe them at greater rates. Before long, this lead to the medications becoming misused and it became apparent that these medications were indeed highly addictive. However,...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Heroin Addiction Recovery opioid opioid crisis opioids pharmaceutical addiction pharmaceutical drug abuse treatment pharmacists Source Type: blogs
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Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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