Prepper medicine: Cayenne pepper boosts metabolism, kills bacteria and even stops bleeding

(Natural News) You can always grow your own medicinal herbs or source them from the wild. But if you could only have one medicinal herb in your survival bag, it should probably be cayenne pepper. Cayenne peppers are a type of chili pepper that belongs to the nightshade family of flowering plants. Originally grown in...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Authors: Stević M, Vlajković M, Veličković F, Stanojević G, Nestorović M, Petrović F Abstract A 69 year old patient was admitted to hospital with massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The clinical presentation of the patient, except for bleeding, was dominated by the presence of neurofibromatosis type 1 - Von Recklinghausen disease. The patient was referred to multislice computed tomography (CT) angiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy, which were performed without successful detection of the bleeding site. The MRI examination showed the existence of a tumor lo...
Source: Hellenic Journal of Nuclear Medicine - Category: Nuclear Medicine Tags: Hell J Nucl Med Source Type: research
Conclusion: To facilitate transparent consent, single-centre rather than pooled outcome data should be utilized. PMID: 32223494 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Scand J Urol Source Type: research
Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is curative for suitable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) patients. Careful anticoagulation prevents postoperative bleeding and thromboembolic recurrence. Heparinization is often guided by aPTT but it can be influenced by Factor VIII - a coagulation factor elevated in CTEPH. Anti-Xa-guided anticoagulation is less affected by other factors. We investigated the correlation between aPTT and Anti-Xa after PEA and the impact of coagulation factors.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (56) Source Type: research
Gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) remains a vexing issue in patients supported with continuous-flow LVADs (CF-LVAD). GIB is associated with hospital readmissions, need for procedures, and blood transfusions. Recent literature has suggested association between angiotensin II antagonism and formation of AVMs in CF-LVAD patients. We hypothesized that ACE inhibitor (ACEi) use is associated with a reduction in GIB.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (43) Source Type: research
Digoxin use has been associated with reduced rate of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in a previous study of patients on left ventricular assistive device (LVAD) support. The purpose of this study was to test the association between digoxin use and GIB events in a large, multicenter, contemporary dataset inclusive of HeartMate 3 devices.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (42) Source Type: research
We have previously reported an association between angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) use and reduced rates of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) after the left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. The purpose of this analysis was to test this association in a large, multi-center database inclusive of HeartMate 3 devices.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (41) Source Type: research
Gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in LVAD patients is most commonly caused by gastrointestinal angiodysplasia (GIAD). Non-pulsatile blood flow in LVAD patients can cause splanchnic submucosal hypoperfusion and hypoxia leading to activation of a HIF1- α /Angiopoietins (Ang) signaling cascade, that can trigger pathological angiogenesis. We have recently shown that the use of digoxin, a potent inhibitor of HIF1-α, is associated with a significant reduction in GIAD related GIB in HeartMate (HM) II and HeartWare HVAD patients.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (40) Source Type: research
Recent studies have suggested arteriovenous malformation related gastrointestinal bleeding (AVM-GIB) after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation is associated with reduced arterial pulsatility and right heart failure. Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) is elevated among patients on LVAD support, and in concert with abnormal expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), binding of Ang-2 to the Tie-2 receptor contributes to abnormal angiogenesis and post-LVAD GIB. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between Ang-2, Tie-2, and VEGF with AVM-GIB and its clinical associates.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (39) Source Type: research
Acquired von Willebrand syndrome is implicated in the pathology of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) after implantation of continuous-flow left ventricular assist systems (CF-LVAS). Adults with blood type (BT) O have lower circulating levels of von Willebrand factor. In this analysis, we sought to explore the association between BT O and GIB following CF-LVAS implantation.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (38) Source Type: research
Gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) remains a common and vexing complication of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support. Recent single-center analyses suggest that ACE inhibitors (ACEi)/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) and digoxin may prevent GIB in LVAD patients. Here we evaluate the effect of heart failure (HF) drug therapies on rates of GIB through analysis of the INTERMACS registry database.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (37) Source Type: research
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