Nonoperating room anesthesia.

[Nonoperating room anesthesia]. Anaesthesist. 2019 Aug 02;: Authors: Kramer J, Malsy M, Sinner B, Graf BM Abstract Anesthesia services outside central surgical facilities (nonoperating room anesthesia, NORA) have become more important. Nonoperating room anesthesia is a challenging field with a wide range of patient ages and interventions. The anesthesiologist is caught between the existing expertise in sedation, respiratory and emergency management and the fact that it may be a potentially avoidable cost factor. The efforts of some specialist departments to carry out sedation themselves even with more complex interventions have therefore increased. In order to permanently establish anesthesia here, apart from the pure anesthesiological expertise, a pronounced willingness to interdisciplinary communication and cooperation is necessary. Only in this way can the participating specialist disciplines be convinced of the anesthesiological added value for the patient. Groups of patients requiring special attention include pediatric patients. The care especially for children under 2 years old also requires the particular anesthesiological expertise of the supervising anesthesiologist; however, profound knowledge, for example in cardiac anesthesia, is also required if special interventions are decentrally managed in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. PMID: 31375866 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Der Anaesthesist - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Anaesthesist Source Type: research

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Abstract Pulmonary hypertension is a term used to describe a complex multifactorial group of conditions diagnosed by an elevated mean pulmonary artery pressure of 20 mm Hg or higher on right heart catheterization. The diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy is important, as it is associated with high rates of maternal morbidity and mortality, even with modern management. Diagnostic testing is important for establishing the diagnosis, type, and severity of pulmonary hypertension, which in turn, dictates treatment options. Echocardiographic assessment is the first step in diagnosis and the gold standard for...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
PMID: 31621690 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Ann Card Anaesth Source Type: research
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Source: Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Ann Card Anaesth Source Type: research
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Source: Shock - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Online Articles Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 22 July 2019Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical AnaesthesiologyAuthor(s): Christian Schmidt, Astrid Ellen Berggreen, Matthias HeringlakeThe clinical usefulness of the so-called “static” cardiac filling pressures - central (CVP) and pulmonary-artery-occlusion-pressure (PAOP) – has come into question for guiding hemodynamic therapy due to their poor ability to predict fluid responsiveness in comparison with other monitoring modalities such as transpulmonary thermodilution-derived volumetric measurements, dynamic variables for assessing fluid responsiveness, and th...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Anaesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
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Source: Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
In the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU), patients that need a cardiac catheterization require a sheath, which is a long narrow catheter that is inserted through the femoral artery. Due to the numerous blood thinners this patient population receives, they must remain flat due to their hypercoagulable state. Often these patients experience increased discomfort related to prolonged bedrest which leads to decreased patient satisfaction. Prior to sheath removal an Activated Clotting Time (ACT) level needs to be evaluated until a therapeutic value that has been determined by the physician has been reached.
Source: Journal of PeriAnesthesia Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: ASPAN National Conference Abstract Source Type: research
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Source: Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Rev Bras Anestesiol Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: E-Challenges & Clinical Decisions Source Type: research
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Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Anaesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
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