Idiopathic Ileocolonic Varices Coexisting with a Colon Polyp Treated Successfully by Endoscopy: A Case Report and Literature Review.

Idiopathic Ileocolonic Varices Coexisting with a Colon Polyp Treated Successfully by Endoscopy: A Case Report and Literature Review. Intern Med. 2019 Jul 31;: Authors: Miwa T, Ibuka T, Ozawa N, Sugiyama T, Kubota M, Imai K, Sakai H, Takai K, Araki H, Shimizu M Abstract Colonic varices are usually associated with portal hypertension. Idiopathic colonic varices are extremely rare. A 68-year-old man with a positive fecal occult blood test result underwent colonoscopy. We detected idiopathic ileocolonic varices and a coexisting ascending colon polyp. While reviewing the literature, we found cases of biopsies and polypectomies resulting in significant bleeding. We herein report a case of idiopathic ileocolonic varices coexisting with a colon polyp treated successfully by endoscopy. The coexistence of colonic varices and a colorectal lesion that requires endoscopic treatment may lead to significant bleeding. During management, the development of a treatment strategy and obtaining informed consent are necessary. PMID: 31366797 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research

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Rationale: Adenocarcinoma coexists with adjacent microscopic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (micro-GIST) is rare, especially in the rectum, where the gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) have the lower incidence rate. It is easy to ignore the concurrent micro-GIST due to the untypical symptoms. Patient concerns: A 77-year-old male patient suffered from lower abdominal pain for 20 days and presented with per rectal bleeding for 10 days. He had the medical history of hypertension and diabetes for more than 25 years. Diagnoses: Endoscopy revealed that the patient had rectum adenocarcinoma and multiple rectum polyps...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research
Portal hypertensive hyperplastic polyps (PHHP) are an unusual finding seen at the time of endoscopy in patients with cirrhosis. They have been recognized lately with limited data and have been associated with bleeding. Data are scarce comparing the clinical and pathologic features of PHHP with hyperplastic polyps in patients without cirrhosis.
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Monday abstract Source Type: research
Case Summary: A 56-year-old man with a history of hypertension and hyperlipidemia was referred by gastroenterology for bleeding per rectum. Because of a family history of colon cancer, he had several prior colonoscopies, most recently 3 years ago, without evidence of pathology. His mother was diagnosed with colon cancer in her mid-40s. His current colonoscopy demonstrated a 2.4 × 1.5 cm cecal adenocarcinoma. Staging workup revealed no evidence of metastatic disease. Because of the patient’s family history, the specimen was further evaluated and found to have high microsatellite instabilit...
Source: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Resident’s Corner Source Type: research
Conclusions: The PillCam SB3 CE system revealed a high prevalence of PHE in the patients with PH. Using this system, evidence of bleeding due to PHE was found in a small but definite proportion of the patients. PMID: 30300988 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Clin Endosc Source Type: research
ConclusionA range of complex health problems is encountered in adults with MAS. These have important implications for transition of patients with MAS and adult care. Long‐term cancer risk is currently unknown but requires careful follow‐up.
Source: Clinical Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
ConclusionsCardiovascular disease, hypertension, polyp size, and polyp location were associated with delayed PPB. More caution is needed when removing polyps in patients with these risk factors. Future studies are warranted to determine appropriate preventive hemostatic measures in these patients.
Source: International Journal of Colorectal Disease - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
ConclusionA range of complex health problems is encountered in adults with MAS. These have important implications for transition of patients with MAS and adult care. Long term cancer risk is currently unknown but requires careful follow‐up.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Clinical Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
​BY ALEJANDRO E. MACIAS; BILLY ZHANG; KRISTEN HUGHES; SHAMIM KHAN, MD; FRANCISCO JACOME, MDA 73-year-old man with a past medical history of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and hyperlipidemia and a surgical history for a coronary artery bypass presented with sudden, severe lower abdominal pain. He characterized his pain as 8/10 and was tender to palpation.Laboratory studies showed a white blood cell count of 7.51 with a glucose of 759, no bands, a platelet count of 230,000, and a lactic acid level of 6.7. Urinalysis showed +5 ketones and a glucose count of greater than 500. An abdominal CT showed possible microperforations...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
Authors: Shaffer S, Brahmania M, Shah H Abstract A 49-year-old Brazilian male presented to the emergency department with a five-day history of abdominal pain, dark stools, and syncope. Physical examination did not reveal any melena on digital rectal examination and there were no stigmata of chronic liver disease. Laboratory results showed hemoglobin of 47 g/L, MCV of 80 fL, and ferritin of 6 ng/mL. Liver enzymes and liver function tests were normal. Abdominal ultrasound showed a cirrhotic liver with splenomegaly and varices suggestive of portal hypertension. His past history was significant for...
Source: Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Can J Gastroenterol Hepatol Source Type: research
Question: A 71-year-old man presented to the emergency department with episodic bright red blood per rectum. He reported that these episodes occur for 15-20 minutes per day for 1- to 2-week periods and usually resolve spontaneously, but that when he bleeds, he has to wear pads or toilet paper to avoid soiling his clothing with blood. These episodes have been occurring for months. He denies any alleviating or exacerbating factors, and denies any pain associated with his bleeding. His past medical history includes diagnoses of rheumatoid arthritis, external hemorrhoids, tubular adenomatous polyps, permanent atrial fibrillati...
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Electronic Clinical Challenges and Images in GI Source Type: research
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