Differentiated thyroid cancer in pediatric population ( ≤18 years): postoperative treatment with radioactive iodine (i-131).

DIFFERENTIATED THYROID CANCER IN PEDIATRIC POPULATION (≤18 YEARS): POSTOPERATIVE TREATMENT WITH RADIOACTIVE IODINE (I-131). Acta Clin Croat. 2019 Mar;58(1):119-127 Authors: Prpić M, Franceschi M, Jukić T, Kust D, Dabelić N, Varjačić T, Lucijanić M, Bolanča A, Kusić Z Abstract The aim is to present data on the treatment and follow-up in a cohort of patients with pediatric thyroid cancer who underwent total thyroidectomy and received postoperative radioactive iodine (I-131) therapy. The study was conducted in a tertiary high-volume thyroid center, in pediatric patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who were consecutively treated during the 1965-2015 period. A total of 45 patients aged ≤18 years having undergone total thyroidectomy with or without selective neck dissection were included in the study. Decision on postoperative I-131 ablation was based on tumor characteristics, postoperative thyroglobulin level, preablative whole body scintigraphy, and/or neck ultrasound. Median age at diagnosis was 15 years. The presence of cervical lymph node metastases was significantly associated with papillary thyroid cancer, larger tumor size, involvement of two thyroid lobes, and multifocal disease. The presence of distant metastases was significantly associated with larger tumor size. None of the patients died during follow-up period, and the 5-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 100%. The 5-year and 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) r...
Source: Acta Clinica Croatica - Category: General Medicine Tags: Acta Clin Croat Source Type: research

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In conclusion, the present case is an extremely rare occurrence of simultaneous multiple RDMs from PTC as the initial presentation.
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Conclusion: Patients with type 1 DM should be examined for thyroid diseases, and patients with suspected thyroid disease should be evaluated with a thyroid ultrasound. Type 1 DM and PTC coexistence albeit very rare; It should be known that type 1 diabetes can be seen together with thyroid cancer. PMID: 31686641 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Diabetes Reviews - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Curr Diabetes Rev Source Type: research
We present a case of a successful combined treatment of a metastatic lymph node with dense macrocalcification with the use of a single RFA session and radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation in a patient with a previous history of total thyroidectomy and neck node dissection for papillary thyroid carcinoma.Diagnoses:A 71-year-old man with papillary thyroid carcinoma underwent total thyroidectomy and neck node dissection followed by RAI ablation. The stimulated serum thyroglobulin level was 4.74 ng/mL at the time of RAI ablation, and the follow-up ultrasonography 3 months later revealed a 15-mm lymph node with dense macrocalcif...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research
CONCLUSION:The low remission rate in our DTC patients is probably due to more advanced disease at time of presentation. Early detection may, therefore, be essential in improving outcome. Ann Saudi Med 2008; 28(4): 277-281
Source: Annals of Saudi Medicine - Category: General Medicine Tags: ISSUE 4 Source Type: research
Authors: Mitchell AL, Gandhi A, Scott-Coombes D, Perros P Abstract This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. This paper provides recommendations on the management of thyroid cancer in adults and is based on the 2014 British Thyroid Association guidelines. Recommendations • Ultrasound scanning (USS) of the nodule or goitre is a crucial investigation in guiding the need for fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). (R) • FNAC should be considered for all nodules with suspicious ultrasound features (U3-U5). If a nodule...
Source: Journal of Laryngology and Otology - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: J Laryngol Otol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The ETA's evidence-based classification of sonographically detected neck abnormalities can help identify PTC patients eligible for more relaxed follow-up. PMID: 27186860 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: J Clin Endocrinol Metab Source Type: research
Abstract A 28 year-old female consulted in 1994 for a left thyroid nodule known for 2 years with documented progression. Left lobe resection was performed. Total thyroidectomy on September 1994 was performed without lymph node dissection. Pathological examination concluded on unilateral 10x40mm medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). RET mutation was negative. Basal and pentagastrin-stimulated CT levels had been normal from 1994 to 2008 when her CT level was found to be elevated at 33 ng/l and increased subsequently to 111 ng/l in 2010. In accordance with guidelines cervical ultrasound was performed repeatedly with negati...
Source: Endokrynologia Polska - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Endokrynol Pol Source Type: research
Abstract Although papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) commonly metastasizes to cervical lymph nodes, prophylactic central neck dissection is controversial. The primary treatment for lymph node metastases is surgical resection. Patients diagnosed with PTC should be assessed preoperatively by cervical ultrasound to evaluate central and lateral neck lymph node compartments. Sonographically suspicious lymph nodes in the lateral neck should be biopsied for cytology or thyroglobulin levels. Any compartment (central or lateral) that has definitive proof of nodal metastases should be formally dissected at the time of thyroidec...
Source: The Surgical Clinics of North America - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Surg Oncol Clin N Am Source Type: research
Although papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) commonly metastasizes to cervical lymph nodes, prophylactic central neck dissection is controversial. The primary treatment for lymph node metastases is surgical resection. Patients diagnosed with PTC should be assessed preoperatively by cervical ultrasound to evaluate central and lateral neck lymph node compartments. Sonographically suspicious lymph nodes in the lateral neck should be biopsied for cytology or thyroglobulin levels. Any compartment (central or lateral) that has definitive proof of nodal metastases should be formally dissected at the time of thyroidectomy.
Source: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
The objectives of the study were to evaluate the performance of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in detecting occult metastases in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and to correlate their presence to tumor and patient characteristics. Twenty-three clinically node-negative PTC patients (21 females, mean age 48.4 years) were prospectively enrolled. Patients were submitted to sentinel lymph node (SLN) lymphoscintigraphy prior to total thyroidectomy. Ultrasound-guided peritumoral injections of 99mTc-phytate (7.4 MBq) were performed. Cervical single-photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography (SPECT/C...
Source: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
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