Can quantitative sensory tests predict failed back surgery?: A prospective cohort study

CONCLUSION The study indicates that assessment of altered central pain processing using current QST is unlikely to identify patients at risk of FBSS and is therefore unlikely to inform clinical decisions.
Source: European Journal of Anaesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Diagnostic and prediction Source Type: research

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For over 20 years, Linda Buonanno lived in fear that her irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) would suddenly interrupt her daily routine with frequent trips to the bathroom and unbearable cramping. Buonanno, now a 71-year-old medical assistant and hairdresser from Methuen, Mass., tried everything from drugs to dairy-free diets. Nothing worked. She remembers a particularly tough period over 10 years ago, when she was working on the factory floor of a medical-device company for up to 10 hours a day, six days a week. When an IBS episode would strike, her co-workers would cover for her as she huddled in a corner, keeled over in pain...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized medicine Research Source Type: news
Low back pain, despite the multitude of explanations and increasing disability associated with it, has been with humans since forever. Who knows why and I’m not about to conjecture. What’s interesting is that despite ergonomic solutions (fail), increased fitness amongst many people (also a fail), surgical solutions (fail), hands on solutions (fail, fail), and a whole bunch of “special” exercises (fail, fail, fail) we still don’t have a handle on how to reduce disability from it. I don’t think there will be many people who haven’t seen this: I’ve never quite worked out why, w...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Back pain Low back pain Pain conditions Research biopsychosocial Chronic pain Clinical reasoning disability pain management Therapeutic approaches Source Type: blogs
ConclusionIn patients with chronic low back pain consistent with a symptomatic LSTV type II or IV in the Castellvi classification, a local injection of lidocaine with or without cortivazol may provide sustained improvements in pain and function. The underlying mechanism is unclear.
Source: Joint Bone Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS Less invasive MCN neurolysis performed under local anesthesia is useful for LBP caused by MCN-E. In patients with intractable LBP, MCN-E should be considered. PMID: 29775161 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Neurosurgery.Spine - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: J Neurosurg Spine Source Type: research
Conclusions The findings suggest that the use of strategies to ignore the pain increases with the intensity of the pain and reduces with longer duration. Additionally, pain perception is sensitive to age and experiences.
Source: Colombian Journal of Anesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Allogeneic MSC therapy may be a valid alternative for the treatment of degenerative disc disease that is more logistically convenient than the autologous MSC treatment. The intervention is simple, does not require surgery, provides pain relief, and significantly improves disc quality.
Source: Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Original Clinical Science-General Source Type: research
Conclusion In patients with chronic low back pain consistent with a symptomatic LSTV type II or IV in the Castellvi classification, a local injection of lidocaine with or without cortivazol may provide sustained improvements in pain and function. The underlying mechanism is unclear.
Source: Joint Bone Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Conclusion In patients with chronic low back pain consistent with a symptomatic LSTV type II or IV in the Castellvi classification, a local injection of lidocaine with or without cortivazol may provide sustained improvements in pain and function. The underlying mechanism is unclear.
Source: Joint Bone Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Discussion The proposed systematic review will be able to provide valuable evidence to help decision-making in the use of gabapentinoids for the treatment of CLBP. This will help advance patient care and potentially highlight limitations in existing evidence to direct future research. Ethics and dissemination Being a systematic review, this study would not necessitate ethical review and approval. We plan to report and publish our study findings in a high impact medical journal, with online access. Trial registration number CRD42016034040.
Source: BMJ Open - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Open access, Anaesthesia, Evidence based practice, Medical management, Neurology, Patient-centred medicine, Rheumatology Protocol Source Type: research
Conclusions: SPECT imaging is helpful in diagnosing sacroiliac joint syndrome and facetal syndrome. Epidural injections were a better choice in cases of low backache, where clinically, the patient had no signs of sacroiliac joint syndrome and facetal syndrome. Spinal injections with steroid and local anaesthetic had better relief. Radiotracer uptake at the pain generating area is a good predictor of outcome. Image guided spinal injection improves the accuracy of the injection.
Source: Neurology India - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
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