Once-Promising Drug Ofev Fails in Mesothelioma Clinical Trial

The search for a cure of mesothelioma hit another roadblock recently when a once-promising immunotherapy drug, combined with standard chemotherapy, failed to slow disease progression in a phase III study. The multicenter study covering 27 countries involved Ofev (nintedanib), a small-molecule enzyme inhibitor drug that had shown considerable potential in earlier studies. Lancet Respiratory Medicine published the trial results, signaling another setback for the highly anticipated use of certain immunotherapy drugs to treat mesothelioma. “Making significant improvements in systemic therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma has proven to be quite challenging,” lead researcher Dr. Giorgio Scagliotti, University of Turin, San Luigi Hospital in Italy, wrote. “Despite promising data from the phase II part of the study, the primary endpoint [progression-free survival] was not met in the phase III part.” Ofev Doesn’t Help with Chemotherapy The recent trial included 458 patients randomly assigned to pemetrexed and cisplatin chemotherapy, plus either Ofev or a placebo. Unfortunately, Ofev provided no advantage. Median progression-free survival was 6.8 months for patients assigned Ofev, compared with seven months for those with the placebo. Median overall survival was 14.4 months in the Ofev group and 16.1 months in the placebo group. A secondary measure of health-related quality of life and average symptom burden index scores only slightly favored the Ofev...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news

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Results from a phase III clinical trial comparing Keytruda (pembrolizumab) to standard chemotherapy shows the immunotherapy drug still has a long way to go as a viable treatment option for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Keytruda did not improve progression-free survival for mesothelioma patients who progressed after first-line chemotherapy. The disappointing results from the PROMISE-meso study were presented at the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) annual meeting last week. It was the first randomized trial comparing progression-free survival between immunotherapy and first-line chemotherapy for mesothelioma p...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
A mesothelioma patient at West Cancer Center in Memphis, Tennessee, is the first in the country to use NovoTTF-100L, a noninvasive electric therapy treatment, since its approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in May. The FDA’s approval of Novocure’s Tumor Treating Fields device for the treatment of mesothelioma marked the first new FDA-approved treatment option for the rare asbestos-related cancer in more than 15 years. NovoTTF-100L uses a low-voltage electrical field that is distributed with three pads attached to the front and back of a person’s chest. The electrical current is designed to di...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
The Princess Margaret Cancer Center in Toronto has moved from SMART to SMARTER with the recent launch of its latest clinical trial for pleural mesothelioma patients. SMARTER is the acronym for Surgery for Mesothelioma After Radiation Therapy using Extensive pleural Resection, which also describes the latest clinical trial. The phase I clinical trial is an unconventional approach to treatment of mesothelioma: Find the maximum tolerated dosage of hypofractionated radiation to stimulate the immune system before aggressive surgery. It comes on the heels of the SMART protocol, which stands for Surgery for Mesothelioma After Rad...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
This study quantifies the disturbing trend that, despite the expansion in the number of patients eligible for expensive and potentially toxic ICIs [immune checkpoint inhibitors], the ratio of those benefiting is decreasing,” wrote Dr. Daniel V.T. Catenacci, co-author of an editorial that accompanied the study in JAMA Network. “Observations in this article are sobering and remind us to keep expectations realistic.” Both Catenacci and Haslem agreed that the study should serve as a reminder to patients, physicians and policy makers to have more realistic discussions about the use of, and expectations of, the...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Sarah Cannon Research Institute in Nashville, Tennessee, and MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston have opened a much-anticipated clinical trial involving a novel T-cell therapy for patients with mesothelioma. The two institutions are establishing dosage levels and measuring efficacy of TC-210, a type of immunotherapy that targets mesothelin, a cell surface protein highly expressed in several cancers. The study also is open to patients with certain types of bile duct, ovarian and non-small cell lung cancer. Participation is based upon individual levels of mesothelin expression. Researchers at the two centers are hoping to ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Conclusions This review describes how leukocyte-heparanase can be a double-edged sword in tumor progression; it can enhance tumor immune surveillance and tumor cell clearance, but also promote tumor survival and growth. We also discuss the potential of using heparanase in leukocyte therapies against tumors, and the effects of heparanase inhibitors on tumor progression and immunity. We are just beginning to understand the influence of heparanase on a pro/anti-tumor immune response, and there are still many questions to answer. How do the pro/anti-tumorigenic effects of heparanase differ across different cancer types? Does...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Dr. Prasad Adusumilli at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center believes novel CAR T-cell therapy will be part of future, standard-of-care treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma. The therapy involves the laboratory reprograming of a patient’s T cells — a type of white blood cell — to attack the cancer by targeting mesothelin, a surface protein. CAR T-cell therapy is a form of immunotherapy that could extend mesothelioma survival significantly. “That’s my goal. That’s what we’ve been working toward for many years,” Adusumilli told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com....
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Researchers at Osaka University in Japan have identified a key component of physical health associated with response to immunotherapy drugs. Among people with non-small cell lung cancer, higher levels of muscle mass predicted a better response to PD-1 inhibitor immunotherapy. Sarcopenia — the term used to describe low muscle mass levels — appears to reduce the benefits a person receives from immunotherapy cancer treatment. “Sarcopenia at baseline is a significant predictor of worse outcome in patients with advanced NSCLC [non-small cell lung cancer] receiving PD-1 blockade,” the study investigators ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
A biotechnology company specializing in innovative cancer therapeutics has opened a clinical trial examining an immunotherapy drug targeting a protein found in 90 percent of malignant mesothelioma tumors. It is the first clinical trial to specifically study a patient population characterized by this protein expression. The target is known as VISTA, a surface protein which inhibits the immune system from working properly and allows the mesothelioma to grow. The drug is CA-170, an orally available molecule and the only anti-VISTA drug being studied today in a cancer clinical trial. And the potential could be huge. “The...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Doctors in China may have uncovered an effective second- or third-line treatment option for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Dr. RongQin Meng, an oncologist at 363 Hospital in Cheng Du, said the investigational drug Apatinib (rivoceranib) could become part of a much-needed advance in mesothelioma treatment. After first- and second-line chemotherapy combinations had failed to slow tumor growth in a 58-year-old woman, Apatinib provided a five-month progression-free survival. “I was surprised at the result,” Meng told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “After taking the drug, the quality o...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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