Pathology of A(H5N8) (Clade 2.3.4.4) Virus in Experimentally Infected Chickens and Mice.

We report the identification of novel HPAIV A(H5N8) clade 2.3.4.4 virus that was isolated from sick domestic duck at commercial farm during the second wave of spread that began in October and affected poultry (ducks; chiсkens) in several European regions of Russia and Western Siberia in 2016. The strain was highly lethal in experimental infection of chickens and mice with IVPI = 2.34 and MLD50 = 1.3log10⁡ EID50, accordingly. Inoculation of chickens with the HPAIV A/H5N8 demonstrated neuroinvasiveness, multiorgan failure, and death of chickens on the 3rd day post inoculation. Virus replicated in all collected organ samples in high viral titers with the highest titer in the brain (6.75±0.1 log10TCID50/ml). Effective virus replication was found in the following cells: neurons and glial cells of a brain; alveolar cells and macrophages of lungs; epithelial cells of a small intestine; hepatocytes and Kupffer cells of a liver; macrophages and endothelial cells of a spleen; and the tubular epithelial cells of kidneys. These findings advance our understanding of histopathological effect of A(H5N8) HPAIV infection. PMID: 31354812 [PubMed]
Source: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Interdiscip Perspect Infect Dis Source Type: research

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Emerg Infect Dis. 2021 Nov;27(11):2960-2962. doi: 10.3201/eid2711.211281.ABSTRACTWe detected infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) virus clade 2.3.4.4b in 2 red fox (Vulpes vulpes) cubs found in the wild with neurologic signs in the Netherlands. The virus is related to avian influenza viruses found in wild birds in the same area.PMID:34670656 | DOI:10.3201/eid2711.211281
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Emerg Infect Dis. 2021;27(11):2940-2943. doi: 10.3201/eid2711.204893.ABSTRACTIn late 2020, we detected 32 highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N8) viruses in migratory ducks in Shanghai, China. Phylogenetic analysis of 5 representative isolates identified 2 sublineages of clade 2.3.4.4b. Each sublineage formed separate clusters with isolates from East Asia and Europe.PMID:34670650 | DOI:10.3201/eid2711.204893
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
We report a disease and mortality event involving swans, seals, and a fox at a wildlife rehabilitation center in the United Kingdom during late 2020. Five swans had onset of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection while in captivity. Subsequently, 5 seals and a fox died (or were euthanized) after onset of clinical disease. Avian-origin influenza A virus subtype H5N8 was retrospectively determined as the cause of disease. Infection in the seals manifested as seizures, and immunohistochemical and molecular testing on postmortem samples detected a neurologic distribution of viral products. The fox died overnight aft...
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Emerg Infect Dis. 2021 Nov;27(11):2960-2962. doi: 10.3201/eid2711.211281.ABSTRACTWe detected infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) virus clade 2.3.4.4b in 2 red fox (Vulpes vulpes) cubs found in the wild with neurologic signs in the Netherlands. The virus is related to avian influenza viruses found in wild birds in the same area.PMID:34670656 | DOI:10.3201/eid2711.211281
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Emerg Infect Dis. 2021;27(11):2940-2943. doi: 10.3201/eid2711.204893.ABSTRACTIn late 2020, we detected 32 highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N8) viruses in migratory ducks in Shanghai, China. Phylogenetic analysis of 5 representative isolates identified 2 sublineages of clade 2.3.4.4b. Each sublineage formed separate clusters with isolates from East Asia and Europe.PMID:34670650 | DOI:10.3201/eid2711.204893
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
We report a disease and mortality event involving swans, seals, and a fox at a wildlife rehabilitation center in the United Kingdom during late 2020. Five swans had onset of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection while in captivity. Subsequently, 5 seals and a fox died (or were euthanized) after onset of clinical disease. Avian-origin influenza A virus subtype H5N8 was retrospectively determined as the cause of disease. Infection in the seals manifested as seizures, and immunohistochemical and molecular testing on postmortem samples detected a neurologic distribution of viral products. The fox died overnight aft...
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Emerg Infect Dis. 2021 Nov;27(11):2960-2962. doi: 10.3201/eid2711.211281.ABSTRACTWe detected infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) virus clade 2.3.4.4b in 2 red fox (Vulpes vulpes) cubs found in the wild with neurologic signs in the Netherlands. The virus is related to avian influenza viruses found in wild birds in the same area.PMID:34670656 | DOI:10.3201/eid2711.211281
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Emerg Infect Dis. 2021;27(11):2940-2943. doi: 10.3201/eid2711.204893.ABSTRACTIn late 2020, we detected 32 highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N8) viruses in migratory ducks in Shanghai, China. Phylogenetic analysis of 5 representative isolates identified 2 sublineages of clade 2.3.4.4b. Each sublineage formed separate clusters with isolates from East Asia and Europe.PMID:34670650 | DOI:10.3201/eid2711.204893
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
We report a disease and mortality event involving swans, seals, and a fox at a wildlife rehabilitation center in the United Kingdom during late 2020. Five swans had onset of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection while in captivity. Subsequently, 5 seals and a fox died (or were euthanized) after onset of clinical disease. Avian-origin influenza A virus subtype H5N8 was retrospectively determined as the cause of disease. Infection in the seals manifested as seizures, and immunohistochemical and molecular testing on postmortem samples detected a neurologic distribution of viral products. The fox died overnight aft...
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Emerg Infect Dis. 2021 Nov;27(11):2960-2962. doi: 10.3201/eid2711.211281.ABSTRACTWe detected infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) virus clade 2.3.4.4b in 2 red fox (Vulpes vulpes) cubs found in the wild with neurologic signs in the Netherlands. The virus is related to avian influenza viruses found in wild birds in the same area.PMID:34670656 | DOI:10.3201/eid2711.211281
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
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