Impact of rotavirus and hepatitis A virus by worldwide climatic changes during the period between 2000 and 2013.

Impact of rotavirus and hepatitis A virus by worldwide climatic changes during the period between 2000 and 2013. Bioinformation. 2019;15(3):194-200 Authors: Tarek F, Hassou N, Benchekroun MN, Boughribil S, Hafid J, Ennaji MM Abstract Enteric viruses are present in the environment as a result of the discharge of poorly or untreated wastewater. The spread of enteric viruses in the environment depend to human activities like stools of infected individuals ejected in the external environment can be transmitted by water sources and back to susceptible individuals for other cycles of illness. Among the enteric viruses Rotaviruses (RV) and Hepatitis A viruses (HAV) is the most detected in wastewater causing gastroenteritis and acute hepatitis. Therefore, it is of interest to climate change, mainly temperature and carbon Dioxide (CO2) variations, on Rotavirus and Hepatitis A as a model of enteric viruses present in the aquatic environment using computational modelling tools. The results of genetic ratio showed a negative correlation between the epidemiological data and the mutation rate. However, the correlation was positive between the temperature, CO2 increase, and the rate of mutation. The positive correlation is explained by the adaptation of the viruses to the climatic changes, the RNA polymerase of the RV induces errors to adapt to the environmental conditions. The simultaneous increase in number of infections and temperature in 2010 has been demonstrated ...
Source: Bioinformation - Category: Bioinformatics Authors: Tags: Bioinformation Source Type: research

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This study aimed to assess anthropogenic impact of surrounding population in the Private Reserve of Natural Heritage at Pantanal, the world's largest freshwater wetland ecosystem located in the centre of South America. Viral aetiological agents of acute gastroenteritis as rotavirus A (RVA), noroviruses, human adenoviruses, klassevirus and of hepatitis, as hepatitis A virus, were investigated in different aquatic matrices. Annual collection campaigns were carried out from 2009 to 2012, alternating dry and rainy seasons. Viral particles present in the samples were concentrated by the adsorption–elution method, with neg...
Source: Letters in Applied Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
This study aimed to assess anthropogenic impact of surrounding population in the Private Reserve of Natural Heritage at Pantanal, the world's largest freshwater wetland ecosystem located in the center of South America. Viral etiologic agents of acute gastroenteritis as rotavirus A (RVA), noroviruses (NoV), human adenoviruses (HAdV), klassevirus (KV) and of hepatitis, as hepatitis A virus (HAV), were investigated in different aquatic matrices. Annual collection campaigns were carried out from 2009 to 2012, alternating dry and rainy seasons. Viral particles present in the samples were concentrated by the adsorption‐elution...
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