The Prevalence of Penile Cancer in patients with Adult Acquired Buried Penis

To determine the prevalence of penile cancer in patients with adult acquired buried penis. Penile cancer is a rare but aggressive cancer. Several case reports have recently been published that indicate that adult acquired buried penis (AABP) may increase the risk of penile cancer.
Source: Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 13 September 2019Source: Molecular and Cellular EndocrinologyAuthor(s): Andreas KortenkampAbstractThere is concern about cumulative exposures to compounds that disrupt male sexual differentiation in foetal life, leading to irreversible effects in adulthood, including declines in semen quality, testes non-descent, malformations of the penis and testis cancer. Traditional chemical-by-chemical risk assessment approaches cannot capture the likely cumulative health risks. Past efforts of focusing on combinations of phthalates, a subgroup of chemicals suspected of contributing to these risks, d...
Source: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Authors: Zeuschner P, Linxweiler J, Junker K Abstract Introduction: Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are important regulators of cellular signaling in tumor-related processes. They can not only be detected in tumor tissues, but also in body fluids. ncRNAs are released into circulation as cell-free RNAs in at least two ways: bound to proteins like Ago2 or packed in extracellular vesicles (EV). Therefore, they have a great potential to serve as biomarkers in liquid biopsies. This review gives an overview of the current knowledge concerning ncRNAs and EVs as putative liquid biomarkers in urological tumor diseases. Areas cover...
Source: Expert Review of Molecular Diagnostics - Category: Laboratory Medicine Tags: Expert Rev Mol Diagn Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 4 September 2019Source: Urology Case ReportsAuthor(s): Cam Nguyen, Stephen Leslie, John Gross, Nicholas Dietz, Subodh M. Lele, Gopi SirineniAbstractPenile cancer is normally discovered in an early stage due to its visibility to the patient. This case report demonstrates a morbidly obese patient with a locally advanced penile cancer hidden by fatty tissue. Biopsy showed P16-positive tumor cells, which responded to concurrent chemo-radiotherapy with no evidence of disease at 24 months of follow-up. We also review the significance of p16-positive cell biology.
Source: Urology Case Reports - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Abstract Human papilloma virus (HPV) affects predominantly the genital area, which includes vagina, cervix, penis, vulva scrotum, rectum and anus. Among 100 types of HPV, 14 types are considered to cause the risky cancer. The gene HPV-16 E7 is responsible for the development of cancer with the infected women. Earlier identification of this gene sequence avoids the cancer progression. The targeted HPV-16 E7 sequence was sandwiched by capture and reporter sequences on the carbodiimidazole-modified interdigitated electrode (IDE) surface. Target sequence at 100 fM was paired to the capture sequence immobilized on IDE ...
Source: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Int J Biol Macromol Source Type: research
Conclusions In our study, the previously developed nomogram that was applied to our population had low accuracy and low precision for correctly identifying patients with PC who have positive ILNs.
Source: International Braz J Urol - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Conclusions In our study, the previously developed nomogram that was applied to our population had low accuracy and low precision for correctly identifying patients with PC who have positive ILNs.
Source: International Braz J Urol - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Doctors at the Koto Hospital in Tokyo, Japan, had to surgically remove the elastic band from the man's penis and then take off part of the flesh which had a carcinoma skin cancer growing on it.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Abstract Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes nearly all cervical cancers and some cancers of the vagina, vulva, penis, anus, and oropharynx (1).* Most HPV infections are asymptomatic and clear spontaneously within 1 to 2 years; however, persistent infection with oncogenic HPV types can lead to development of precancer or cancer (2). In the United States, the 9-valent HPV vaccine (9vHPV) is available to protect against oncogenic HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 as well as nononcogenic types 6 and 11 that cause genital warts. CDC analyzed data from the U.S. Cancer Statistics (USCS)† to assess the incide...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 August 2019Source: Urology Case ReportsAuthor(s): Takahiro Yoshida, Daisuke Watanabe, Tadaaki Minowa, Akemi Yamashita, Kunihisa Miura, Akio MizushimaAbstractPenile strangulation is a disease which causes circulatory failure in the distal part of the penis by the penis strangulated by foreign substances, and it is a rare emergency disease in urology. Most of the motives are for pranks, sexual intercourses and treatments of incontinence. We herein report the clinical course of penile strangulation complicated by penile cancer. Although the treatment was completed in accordance with its c...
Source: Urology Case Reports - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
This article discusses pathological features of tumours of the male genital tract. Carcinoma of the prostate is common and represents an increasing burden to the NHS in terms of management and treatment. We focus on recent changes to grading and discuss issues around pathological diagnosis. Tumours of the testes represent the greatest success story of cancer treatment over the past several decades. We review the pathological features of the commonest tumours focusing on prognostic features. Carcinoma of the penis is rare but appears to be increasing in incidence. It requires more awareness amongst the public and general pr...
Source: Surgery (Oxford) - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
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