Epithelial ‐to‐mesenchymal transition (EMT) to sarcoma in recurrent lung adenosquamous carcinoma following adjuvant chemotherapy

Adjuvant chemotherapy has long been indicated to extend survival in completely resected stage IB to IIIA non ‐small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, there is accumulating evidence that chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy can induce epithelial‐to‐mesenchymal transition (EMT) in disseminated or circulating NSCLC cells. Here, we describe the first case of EMT as the cause of recurrence and metastasis in a patient with resected stage IIB lung adenosquamous carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy. We review the literature and explore the possible mechanisms by which EMT occurs in disseminated tumor cells (DTC) or circulating tumor cells (CTC) in response to adjuvant chemotherapy (cisplatin) as a stres sor. We also explore the possible therapeutic strategies to reverse EMT in patients with recurrence. In summary, although adjuvant cisplatin‐based chemotherapy in resected NSCLC does extend survival, it may lead to the adverse phenomenon of EMT in disseminated tumor cells (DTC) or circulating tumo r cells (CTC) causing recurrence and metastasis.
Source: Thoracic Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: CASE REPORT Source Type: research

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ConclusionThe newly-developed nomogram can effectively predict the survival outcome of patients with HSCC. According to the novel stratification criteria created, patients stratified as high-risk could benefit from POAT, while those in the low-risk group are advised not to receive POAT as this correlates with a worse OS.
Source: European Journal of Surgical Oncology (EJSO) - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 14 September 2019Source: Journal of Advanced ResearchAuthor(s): Simone Kumstel, Praveen Vasudevan, Rupert Palme, Xianbin Zhang, Edgar Heinz Uwe Wendt, Robert David, Brigitte Vollmar, Dietmar ZechnerAbstractProspective severity assessment is legally required in many countries to ensure high-quality research along with high welfare standards for laboratory animals. Mice and rats, the most common laboratory species, are prey animals that usually suppress signs of pain and suffering. Therefore, highly sensitive readout parameters are necessary to adequately quantify distress. The present stud...
Source: Journal of Advanced Research - Category: Research Source Type: research
Authors: Reinert T, Coelho GP, Mandelli J, Zimermann E, Zaffaroni F, Bines J, Barrios CH, Graudenz MS Abstract Mutations in the ESR1 gene (ESR1m) are important mechanisms of resistance to endocrine therapy in estrogen receptor-positive advanced breast cancer and have been recognized as a prognostic and predictive biomarker as well as a potential therapeutic target. However, the prevalence of ESR1m in real-world patients has not been adequately described. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the prevalence of ESR1m in metastatic samples from Brazilian patients with estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) advanced breast cancer...
Source: Journal of Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: J Oncol Source Type: research
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Source: Academic Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 September 2019Source: Social Science &MedicineAuthor(s): Piper SledgeAbstractIn this paper, I draw on the narratives of 57 individuals whose gender identities and decisions about their bodies trouble the medical protocols for breast and gynecological cancer care. I focus here on the decision-making process for three groups of elective surgeries: hysterectomy, prophylactic bilateral and contralateral mastectomy, and breast reconstruction. These elective surgeries illustrate places in medical interactions where patients and providers rely on frames of gender to determine whether a gi...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Conclusions The recent, first randomized clinical trial demonstrated overall and progression free survival benefits after SBRT to oligometastatic disease which supports prior retrospective case series (6). The spine is a common site of metastatic bone disease, and as high quality data continue to mature, along with completion of additional randomized clinical trials, it is expected that utility of SBRT to the spine will increase in the future. Spine SBRT is unique due to the requirement of sharp dose falloff to prevent serious neurologic morbidity. With recent advances in radiotherapy planning, robotic patient positionin...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Michal Yalon1†, Amos Toren1,2†, Dina Jabarin2, Edna Fadida3, Shlomi Constantini3 and Ruty Mehrian-Shai1* 1Pediatric Hemato-Oncology, Edmond and Lilly Safra Children's Hospital and Cancer Research Center, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan, Israel 2The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel 3Department of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Dana Children's Hospital, Tel-Aviv-Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel Pediatric brain tumors are the most common solid tumor type and the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. The immune system plays an important r...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Markus Hartl* and Rainer Schneider Center of Molecular Biosciences (CMBI), Institute of Biochemistry, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria The neuronal proteins GAP43 (neuromodulin), MARCKS, and BASP1 are highly expressed in the growth cones of nerve cells where they are involved in signal transmission and cytoskeleton organization. Although their primary structures are unrelated, these signaling proteins share several structural properties like fatty acid modification, and the presence of cationic effector domains. GAP43, MARCKS, and BASP1 bind to cell membrane phospholipids, a process reversibly regulate...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Monica Parodi1, Herman Favoreel2, Giovanni Candiano3, Silvia Gaggero4, Simona Sivori4,5, Maria Cristina Mingari1,4,5, Lorenzo Moretta6, Massimo Vitale1 and Claudia Cantoni4,5,7* 1Immunology Operative Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy 2Department of Virology, Parasitology and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium 3Laboratory of Molecular Nephrology, IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Genoa, Italy 4Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy 5Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Authors: Salmaninejad A, Zamani MR, Pourvahedi M, Golchehre Z, Bereshneh AH, Rezaei N Abstract Cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) are named based on their expression pattern that is restricted in a number of normal and abnormal tissues. Tumor cells frequently express antigens whose expression is typically restricted to germ cells. Their unique expression pattern is guaranteed by precise epigenetic regulatory mechanisms. Because of their tumor-limited, high immunogenicity, and biased expression, discovery of these molecules provides unprecedented opportunities for further research and clinical development in the field of...
Source: Immunological Investigations - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Immunol Invest Source Type: research
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