Causes of oocyte vitrification and its value in assisted reproductive technology.

CONCLUSIONS: Oocytes vitrification can be used as a remedy for infertile couples who fail to provide sperms due to male factors on the day of oocyte retrieval. Vitrification of the oocytes does not significantly affect the fertilization rate or the clinical pregnancy rate. The survival rate of the thawed oocytes is related to the age of the wife, and an age younger than 35 years can be optimal for achieving favorable clinical pregnancy outcomes after oocyte vitrification. PMID: 31340907 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Southern Medical University - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao Source Type: research

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Conclusion: Men with AZF microdeletions can achieve the delivery of healthy children using ICSI. In this series, it produced good implantation rate and obstetric and perinatal outcomes.
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Trial/Experimental Study Source Type: research
We report an infertile male with NOA, a solitary left testicle and a left clinical varicocele. The patient first underwent an extensive left microTESE. No spermatozoa were seen on initial microscopic evaluation but after an extensive search, spermatozoa were identified. ICSI did not result in pregnancy. Fifteen months after the microTESE, the patient underwent a left microsurgical varicocelectomy. A semen analysis post-varicocelectomy revealed the presence of sperm.
Source: Urology Case Reports - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Rationale: Infertile men with Y-chromosome microdeletions have been reported to be able to have their own children via intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Patient concerns: A 27-year-old man with Y-chromosome azoospermia factor c (AZFc) deletions underwent ICSI treatment. The pregnancy showed a high risk for trisomy 21 syndrome (risk value: 1 in 150). Diagnoses: The karyotype of the patient was 46, XY, inv (9) (p11q13). His wife had a normal karyotype. Sequence-tagged site-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed that markers sY254 and sY255 were absent. ICSI was performed. Two embryos (6IV, 8II) ...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research
Conclusion The periconceptional environment and lifestyle factors modify sperm epigenome. This alteration might be maintained in the zygote and throughout development, thereby leading to the inheritance of newly acquired pathologies. The role of sperm miRNA, not only as innovative markers of fertility issues but also as vectors involved in the inheritance of paternal diseases, appears to be crucial. Overweight and obesity seem to alter sperm miRNA profile, thereby leading to transmission of different miRNA profiles in zygote, with consequences on embryo development. In long term, metabolic disorders have been described in...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
ConclusionThe incidence of chromosomal abnormalities in Qatar as a cause of severe male infertility is within a similar range as their prevalence internationally.
Source: Arab Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Neither sperm parameters nor the source of spermatozoa affects delivery rate through ICSI in poor responder women
Source: Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: Clin Exp Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
Conclusion The incidence of chromosomal abnormalities in Qatar as a cause of severe male infertility is within a similar range as their prevalence internationally.
Source: Arab Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Conclusions Post-chemotherapy azoospermia can be successfully treated with TESE and ICSI, and should be offered to azoospermic cancer survivors who did not cryopreserve sperm prior to their gonadotoxic treatments.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Post-chemotherapy azoospermia can be successfully treated with TESE and ICSI, and should be offered to azoospermic cancer survivors who did not cryopreserve sperm prior to their gonadotoxic treatments. PMID: 29179011 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Reproductive Biology - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol Source Type: research
Abstract IntroductionTesticular microdissection sperm extraction (MD‐TESE) combined with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has made biological fatherhood possible for many men with the most severe form of male infertility, non‐obstructive azoospermia. MD‐TESE was introduced in Turku in 2008, and by 2015, 100 Finnish men with non‐obstructive azoospermia have been operated on. Material and methodsThe average age of the men was 33 years at the time of surgery. Forty‐eight had a needle biopsy previously and 56% had a testicular size
Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Original Research Article Source Type: research
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