Diet and Nutritional Interventions With the Special Role of Myo-Inositol in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Management. An Evidence-Based Critical Appraisal.

CONCLUSIONS: More studies should be conducted to prove the most effective nutritional intervention in GDM. Regarding the potential effectiveness of MI, further evidences in multicenter , randomized controlled trials are needed to draw firm conclusions. PMID: 31333107 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research

Related Links:

The obesity and diabetes epidemic is an unintended consequence of economic, social, and technological changes. In nonpregnancy, people identified as high risk to develop type 2 diabetes may delay progression by 30 –70% with lifestyle interventions and pharmacological agents. In pregnancy, lifestyle interventions have been the primary focus to prevent fetal short- and long-term complications that may evolve into substantial weight gain and gestational diabetes mellitus. The dilemma for obstetricians is wheth er diabetes and obesity can be prevented and not simply treated after the fact.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Clinical Opinion Source Type: research
The obesity and diabetes epidemic is an unintended consequence of economic, social and technological changes. In non-pregnancy, people identified as high risk to develop type 2 diabetes may delay progression by 30 to 70% with lifestyle interventions and pharmacological agents. In pregnancy, lifestyle interventions has been the primary focus to prevent fetal short and long term complications that may evolve into substantial weight gain and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The dilemma for obstetricians is whether diabetes and obesity can be prevented and not simply treated after the fact.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Clinical Opinion Source Type: research
Gestational diabetes mellitus, (GDM) is defined as impaired glucose tolerance developed during pregnancy, of which the etiology is similar to that of type 2 diabetes mellitus, (DM) [1]. The prevalence of GDM ranges from 2 –10% in the United States, while a recent survey reported it to be 7.4% in Taiwan [2,3]. The population with GDM has been increasing worldwide owing to the epidemic of obesity, and its prevalence is elevated to 18% when the new criteria for diagnosing GDM is used [4]. Insulin resistance and hyperi nsulinemia can occur during pregnancy, which can lead to GDM in those without pregestational diabetes a...
Source: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Source Type: research
Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects approximately 6% of pregnant women, and prevalence is increasing in parallel with the obesity epidemic. Protocols for screening/diagnosing GDM are controversial with several guidelines available. Treatment of GDM results in a reduction in the incidence of preeclampsia, shoulder dystocia, and macrosomia. If diet and lifestyle changes do not result in target glucose levels, then treatment with metformin, glyburide, or insulin should begin. It is generally recommended that pregnancies complicated by GDM do not go beyond term. For women identified to have prediabetes, intensive lifes...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a form of diabetes that is first recognised during pregnancy, with no evidence of pre-existing type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The prevalence of GDM has been rising steadily over the past few decades, coinciding with the ongoing epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Although GDM normally disappears after delivery, women who have been previously diagnosed with GDM are at a greater risk of developing gestational diabetes in subsequent pregnancies, and type 2 diabetes later in life. Infants born to mothers with GDM also have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes in ...
Source: International Journal of Clinical Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Clin Chim Acta Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 14 February 2017 Source:Clinica Chimica Acta Author(s): Kai P. Law, Hua Zhang Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a form of diabetes that is first recognised during pregnancy, with no evidence of pre-existing type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The prevalence of GDM has been rising steadily over the past few decades, coinciding with the ongoing epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Although GDM normally disappears after delivery, women who have been previously diagnosed with GDM are at a greater risk of developing gestational diabetes in subsequent pregnancies, and type 2 diabetes later in ...
Source: Clinica Chimica Acta - Category: Laboratory Medicine Source Type: research
When I’m seeing a new patient, I am especially alert to certain pieces of their history. Do they have a strong family history of diabetes? Are they of Latino, Asian, Native-American, or African-American ethnicity? Did they have diabetes in pregnancy? Are they overweight or obese? Do they have polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)? Why do I care about these things? Because they may be clues that the patient is at risk for developing adult-onset (type 2) diabetes, and that can lead to multiple major medical problems. Many people have heard of type 2 diabetes, a disease where the body loses its ability to manage sugar leve...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Exercise and Fitness Healthy Aging Prevention Source Type: blogs
Pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM) represents the most common chronic condition complicating pregnancy. In recent years, the number of pregnancies affected has been increasing because of the obesity epidemic and the consequent increase of Type 2 diabetes in younger women [1 –4]. Concerns have been voiced about the possibility of an excess risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with PGDM, with a view to congenital anomalies, premature birth, fetal macrosomia and perinatal mortality [5–7].
Source: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Source Type: research
Amer J Perinatol DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1586500Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has increased dramatically in the past 20 years together with the obesity epidemic. Mirroring the increase in incidence of GDM is increasing use of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). EDCs are structurally similar to endogenous hormones and interfere with synthesis, secretion, activity, or elimination of natural hormones, resulting in adverse health effects, including diabetes, obesity, developmental disorders, etc. Although the association between bisphenol A (BPA), a well-studied EDC, and type 2 diabetes has been repeatedly investigated in...
Source: American Journal of Perinatology - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Tags: Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group Source Type: research
Abstract Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance of varying severity and is present in about 2–6% of all pregnancies in Europe, making it one of the most common pregnancy disorders. Aside from the short-term maternal, fetal and neonatal consequences associated with GDM, there are long-term consequences for both mother and child. Although maternal glucose tolerance often normalises shortly after pregnancy, women with GDM have a substantially increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Studies have reported that women are more than seven times as likely to develop...
Source: Diabetologia - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
More News: Diabetes | Diabetes Mellitus | Diabetes Type 2 | Diets | Drugs & Pharmacology | Eating Disorders & Weight Management | Endocrinology | Epidemics | Epidemiology | Insulin | Nutrition | Obesity | Perinatology & Neonatology | Pregnancy | Sports Medicine | Study | Women