Are claims of non-inferiority of Internet and computer-based cognitive-behavioural therapy compared with in-person cognitive-behavioural therapy for adults with anxiety disorders supported by the evidence from head-to-head randomised controlled trials? A systematic review.

CONCLUSION: There is limited evidence from randomised controlled trials which supports claims that computer- or Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy for anxiety disorders is not inferior to in-person delivery. Randomised controlled trials properly designed to test non-inferiority are needed before conclusions about the relative benefits of in-person and Internet- and computer-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy can be made. PROSPERO: CRD420180961655-6. PMID: 31339342 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Aust N Z J Psychiatry Source Type: research

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This study investigated the frequency of PTSD in relation to comorbidities by analyzing the results of the 2007 ‘Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey’ in the English population, which included data on comorbidities. A population study conducted in the United Kingdom, this survey investigated the frequency of PTSD in the community and the relationship to comorbidities by adopting a random design to minimize selection bias, stratified by region and socioeconomic characteristics, and weighted according to design and non-response. The survey interviewed 7403 adults living in private households. Socio-demographic char...
Source: Psychiatric Quarterly - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
You have finally found a medication to treat your depression that your body tolerates well. It has taken your psychiatrist months to find the optimal dose (after two failed medication trials). The COVID-19 pandemic hit, but in spite of your new daily stressors, you seem to be doing relatively well. That is, until you hear that your antidepressant medication is now in short supply. What can you do? Mental health treatment during COVID-19 With the increased stress of the COVID-19 pandemic, prescriptions for medications to treat mental illnesses have increased more than 20% between February and March 2020. Sertraline, or Zolo...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Behavioral Health Mental Health Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: The knowledge of factors that impact on treatment adherence can be useful for clinicians to guide patient-centred care. PMID: 32295226 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medicina (Kaunas) - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Medicina (Kaunas) Source Type: research
Authors: Lognoul M, Nasello J, Triffaux JM Abstract The exposure in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a well-known intervention, widely investigated in scientific research. Several studies have shown the benefits of this intervention in the treatment of anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) and post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD). The different exposure techniques are mainly based on the emotional processing of fear theory and use an emotional stimulation of fear, following by its habituation. However, new approaches have emerged and are based on the inhibitory learning theory. The virtual ...
Source: L Encephale - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Encephale Source Type: research
Authors: Freire RC, Cabrera-Abreu C, Milev R Abstract Many pharmacological treatments were proved effective in the treatment of panic disorder (PD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); still many patients do not achieve remission with these treatments. Neurostimulation techniques have been studied as promising alternatives or augmentation treatments to pharmacological and psychological therapies. The most studied neurostimulation method for anxiety disorders, PTSD, and OCD was repetitive transcranial magne...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
It’s completely normal to feel anxious in social situations. Be it giving a speech or talking on the phone, social anxiety affects a surprisingly large percentage of the population. However, when one experiences considerable distress and an impaired ability to function in parts of their daily life, it is likely they will be diagnosed as social anxiety disorder.1 Many people with social anxiety disorder do not know that they have it. They may recognize that there is something “wrong,” but do not know what it is or what to do about it. This is where mindfulness can help. By being mindful, aware of the prese...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic Mindfulness Jon Kabat Zinn Meditation secular mindfulness Social Anxiety Source Type: blogs
Anxiety has a bidirectional association with epilepsy [1] and is more frequent among people with epilepsy (PWE) than in people without epilepsy [2 –6]. Because anxiety has significant impacts on quality of life (QOL) and treatment outcomes in PWE, the identification of anxiety is crucial for the management of this disorder. Anxiety disorders (ADs) in PWE include a variety of subtypes such as generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), agoraphobia (A P), social phobia (SP), panic disorder (PD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD; 7, 8].
Source: Seizure: European Journal of Epilepsy - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 27 August 2019Source: Pharmacology &TherapeuticsAuthor(s): Simone B. Sartori, Nicolas SingewaldAbstractCurrent medication for anxiety disorders is suboptimal in terms of efficiency and tolerability, highlighting the need for improved drug treatments. In this review an overview of drugs being studied in different phases of clinical trials for their potential in the treatment of fear-, anxiety- and trauma-related disorders is presented. One strategy followed in drug development is refining and improving compounds interacting with existing anxiolytic drug targets, such as serotonergic an...
Source: Pharmacology and Therapeutics - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Authors: Sancassiani F, Romano F, Balestrieri M, Caraci F, Di Sciascio G, Drago F, Hardoy MC, Moro MF, Roncone R, Piras M, Preti A, Dell'Osso L, Faravelli C, Carta MG Abstract Introduction: The study aimed to see if a community survey conducted by clinical interviewers with semi-structured psychiatric interviews shows lifetime prevalence rates of Specific Phobia (SP) similar to those found by surveys carried out by lay interviewers and if the high level of impairment found in SP may be confirmed. Methods: This is a community survey on an Italian nationwide sample randomly selected from registers of municipaliti...
Source: Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Clin Pract Epidemiol Ment Health Source Type: research
Conclusion It is clear that clinically, there is still much to be learnt about alexithymia and its relationship with a range of related phenomena. Firstly, is alexithymia a continuous and stable trait independent of psychological or somatic symptomology that is developed during childhood? Or is it instead a reactive state induced by trauma and distress at any age, which serves to defend against intense and upsetting emotions? This impacts on treatment options. For example, should we be focussing on early childhood interventions which target the child's emotional environment and parenting to encourage emotional exp...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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