CBT improves dysfunctional attitudes, memory in bipolar disorder

Cognitive behavioural therapy improves dysfunctional attitudes and is associated with a reduction in residual symptoms in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder, results from a French study show.
Source: MedWire News - Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

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CONCLUSION: Treatment of patients suffering from both bd and aud should always focus on both disorders, either simultaneously or separately. If this approach is successful it is vitally important that care is better organised and that there is cooperation between institutions involved in treating addiction disorders and departments that specialise in the care of bd. These improvements are likely to lead to further developments and to more research into new forms of integrated treatment. PMID: 29436699 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Tijdschrift voor Psychiatrie - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Tijdschr Psychiatr Source Type: research
DiscussionThe CUES+ study will contribute to the currently limited child-specific evidence base for psychological interventions for UEDs occurring in the context of psychosis or any other mental health presentation.Trial registrationInternational Standard Randomised Controlled Trials, ID:ISRCTN21802136. Prospectively registered on 12 January 2015. Protocol V3 31 August 2015 with screening amended.
Source: Trials - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
ConclusionsOnly interventions for family members affected relapse rates. Psychoeducation plus CBT reduced medication non-adherence, improved mania symptoms and GAF. Novel methods for addressing depressive symptoms are required. PMID: 28209591 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The British Journal of Psychiatry for Mental Science - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Br J Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions The present study evaluates participants' therapy experiences in detail, including aspects of therapy viewed as helpful, and meaningful post-therapy outcomes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley &Sons, Ltd. KEY PRACTITIONER MESSAGE: This is the first paper to qualitatively explore people's experiences of individual psychotherapy for bipolar disorders. It highlights elements of psychotherapy described as particularly helpful or unhelpful and the clinical changes viewed as most impactful. Participants reported benefitting in a number of ways from TEAMS therapy. They valued learning to reappraise and problem-...
Source: Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Clin Psychol Psychother Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 23 July 2016 Source:The Lancet Author(s): David A Richards, David Ekers, Dean McMillan, Rod S Taylor, Sarah Byford, Fiona C Warren, Barbara Barrett, Paul A Farrand, Simon Gilbody, Willem Kuyken, Heather O'Mahen, Ed R Watkins, Kim A Wright, Steven D Hollon, Nigel Reed, Shelley Rhodes, Emily Fletcher, Katie Finning Background Depression is a common, debilitating, and costly disorder. Many patients request psychological therapy, but the best-evidenced therapy—cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)—is complex and costly. A simpler therapy—behavioural activat...
Source: The Lancet - Category: Journals (General) Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe present study evaluates participants' therapy experiences in detail, including aspects of therapy viewed as helpful, and meaningful post‐therapy outcomes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley &Sons, Ltd. Key Practitioner Message This is the first paper to qualitatively explore people's experiences of individual psychotherapy for bipolar disorders. It highlights elements of psychotherapy described as particularly helpful or unhelpful and the clinical changes viewed as most impactful. Participants reported benefitting in a number of ways from TEAMS therapy. They valued learning to reappraise and problem‐so...
Source: Clinical Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
Authors: Knutsson J, Bäckström B, Daukantaitė D, Lecerof F Abstract Although pharmacological treatments can help alleviate mood symptoms in youth with paediatric bipolar disorder (PBD), residual symptoms still commonly persist. In many cases, these symptoms seriously affect the social and psychological development of children and adolescents suffering from PBD. Complementary interventions, such as psychosocial and psychoeducational treatments, can help children and their families manage mood regulation and other challenges throughout childhood and adolescence. However, most research on such interventions...
Source: Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Clin Psychol Psychother Source Type: research
This study is registered with PROSPERO, number CRD42012002441. Findings We identified 1480 articles in our search and included 53 articles (54 trials; 6652 participants) in the network meta-analysis. Behavioural therapy (mean difference −14·48 [95% credible interval −18·61 to −10·23]; 11 trials and 287 patients), cognitive therapy (−13·36 [–18·40 to −8·21]; six trials and 172 patients), behavioural therapy and clomipramine (−12·97 [–19·18 to −6·74]; one trial and 31 patients), cognitive behavioural therapy ...
Source: The Lancet Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Although pharmacological treatments can help alleviate mood symptoms in youth with paediatric bipolar disorder (PBD), residual symptoms still commonly persist. In many cases, these symptoms seriously affect the social and psychological development of children and adolescents suffering from PBD. Complementary interventions, such as psychosocial and psychoeducational treatments, can help children and their families manage mood regulation and other challenges throughout childhood and adolescence. However, most research on such interventions has focused on children, single‐family psychoeducation, and individual cognitive beh...
Source: Clinical Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
Although pharmacological treatments can help alleviate mood symptoms in youth with paediatric bipolar disorder (PBD), residual symptoms still commonly persist. In many cases, these symptoms seriously affect the social and psychological development of children and adolescents suffering from PBD. Complementary interventions, such as psychosocial and psychoeducational treatments, can help children and their families manage mood regulation and other challenges throughout childhood and adolescence. However, most research on such interventions has focused on children, single‐family psychoeducation, and individual cognitive beh...
Source: Clinical Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
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