Antibiotics before liver transplants lead to better results

A UCLA-led research team has  found that giving mice antibiotics for 10 days prior to a liver transplant leads to better liver function after the surgery.After concluding the experiment mice, the scientists discovered data from liver transplants performed between October 2013 and August 2015 at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, revealing that the same phenomenon appears to hold true in humans. The statistics from human patients even demonstrated that the people who were in worse health prior to their surgeries but received pre-surgery antibiotics fared better after their transplants than the patients who were healthier prior to their surgeries but did not receive antibiotics.The researchers concluded that the antibiotics inhibited bacteria that causes inflammation, which in turn can lead to organ rejection. Specifically, they found that in both mice and humans, the treatment prior to a transplant reduced damage that could occur when blood flow is restored to the liver after a period of time without oxygen; and it reduced inflammation and cell damage while accelerating the removal of damaged cells. As a result, liver function was better than in the mice and human patients who did not receive antibiotics before a transplant.Humans carry trillions of bacteria, many of which are essential for health — aiding in food digestion, for example. But other bacteria are linked to inflammatory bowel disease, cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes and even Parkinson...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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We examined 9293 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements of total cholesterol, free- and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, and particle concentration. Fourteen subclasses of decreasing size and their lipid constituents were analysed: six subclasses were very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), one intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL), three low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and four subclasses were high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Remnant lipoproteins were VLDL and IDL combined. Mean nonfasting cholesterol concentration was 72...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This short open access review is a good introduction to what is known of the changes to the microbial population of the gut that take place over the course of aging. Collectively, the activity of gut microbes is influential on health, arguably to a similar degree as exercise, though far less well quantified at this time. Altering the distribution of bacterial populations in older animals, to better resemble what is observed in young animals, leads to benefits to health, for example. Some of the specific mechanisms by which beneficial gut microbes improve health are being uncovered, such as the secretion of propionate, a co...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
AbstractBackground and AimsPrior studies have shown that about 90% of all carcinoid tumors occur in the GI tract. However, epidemiological studies of these tumors have been limited by small sample size. Our aim was to obtain a more robust epidemiologic survey of large bowel carcinoids (LBC), using population-based data in order to more accurately identify risk factors for these tumors.MethodsWe used a commercial database (Explorys Inc, Cleveland, OH) which includes electronic health record data from 26 major integrated US healthcare systems. We identified all patients aged 18 and older who were diagnosed with LBC, excludin...
Source: Digestive Diseases and Sciences - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
This study suggests the potential beneficial effect of A. muciniphila on IBD and the importance of the future study of the function of A. muciniphila at the strain-level.
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Listen to critics of the Wheat Belly lifestyle and you’d think that, by banishing all things wheat and grains from your life, you will be excommunicated from your church, tossed out of your club, ostracized by friends and family, and suffer dire health consequences like heart disease and colon cancer. After all, they say that you are eliminating an entire food group and will be crippled by lack of fiber and nutrients. Worse, our focus on increasing our intake of fats and oils will get you a heart attack, three stents, or bypass surgery and you’ll be obliged to take Lipitor and Repatha for a lifetime. First of a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle grain-free Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: Results from ongoing prospective studies on the effects of biologics on markers of systemic inflammation in patients with psoriasis will strengthen the clinical evidence base that can be used to inform treatment decisions for patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. PMID: 31225638 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The British Journal of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Br J Dermatol Source Type: research
ConclusionThis is one of the largest studies to date to describe the epidemiology of EoCRC in USA. We found EoCRC to occur predominantly in the Caucasian and female population. EoCRC presented more frequently with left-sided and rectal CRC. We also identified signs/symptoms as well as comorbidities associated with EoCRC. Patients with these features may benefit from earlier screening.
Source: Digestive Diseases and Sciences - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
By just engaging in the basic strategies in the Wheat Belly Total Health, Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox, or Undoctored programs, many mild cases of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, SIBO, reverse. These efforts thereby restore your ability to ingest prebiotic fibers without diarrhea, bloating, gas, abdominal discomfort, joint pain, and dark emotional feelings. Many people thereby are relieved of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, fibromyalgia, or restless leg syndrome, or have greater power in reversing autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Unfortunately, not everybody enjoys reversal of SIBO with our b...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: SIBO grain-free probiotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Digestive Disorders Family Planning and Pregnancy Inflammation Probiotics Source Type: blogs
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