A belated birthday present …

Stefano accompanied me to my fractured shoulder checkup at the hospital on Friday. I had two X-rays of my left shoulder, and then we went to see the orthopedist. Well, the news is much (MUCH!) better than expected: the fracture is actually no longer visible on the X-rays, yep, no kidding!, and my humerus is back in its place. I am going to need more physiotherapy, since my range of motion is still not perfect, even though I can now put both arms above my head, and you can’t tell the difference between the two. But I still can’t make certain movements, such as reaching behind my back enough to hook my bra. So, yes, more physiotherapy…No problem, I love my physiotherapist…She’s excellent! Getting back to the orthopedic visit on Friday, I wanted to note that both orthopedists (yes, there were two at one point…A Grey’s Anatomy scenario) were surprised that I was doing so well and that the fracture had healed so quickly. In fact, when I raised my arms above my head, the professor laughed, shook my hand vigorously and told me to get out of his office. Stefano noticed their surprised reaction, too. I was tempted to tell them about my curcumin intake…but in the end I decided not to…They probably would have given me the (ever-annoying) eye roll…Besides, it might just be that I have great bones, and that curcumin had nothing to do with the fast healing of this fracture… Who knows? Incidentally, a month ago the o...
Source: Margaret's Corner - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Blogroll fractured humerus Source Type: blogs

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Since I’ve been pretty much housebound because of my fractured humerus, I finally decided to go through our closets and get rid of all the clothes we don’t/can’t wear anymore. Of course, I have to be careful not to hurt my shoulder, and believe me, careful I am! But I can’t just lie around with the cats (our Pixie, in the photo) and watch TV series nonstop…   Speaking of my shoulder, well it’s healing…and healing well, I think. I can now raise my arm above my head. Compare that to a month ago when I could barely lift my arm! Thank you, physiotherapy! I have my third checkup,...
Source: Margaret's Corner - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Blogroll bone cancer curcumin Source Type: blogs
Purpose: Frozen shoulder is a common condition and current guidelines state that it is a diagnosis of exclusion. Along with a history and clinical examination, routine x-ray is mandated to rule out any masquerading pathology such as fracture, dislocation, metastatic lesions or severe OA. Despite the certainty of the guidelines there is a lack of evidence to support the use of routine x-rays in this situation.
Source: Physiotherapy - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: O004 Source Type: research
Authors: Funk JF, Lebek S Abstract This manuscript evaluates the recent standard concept for clubfoot treatment. With regard to the history of clubfoot therapy and the return to conservative methods, the focus is laid on Ponseti's treatment concept. Due to its development according to the precise analysis of the pathoanatomy, the practical principle is simple and easy to learn and consists basically of two redression maneuvers, percutaneous achillotenotomy, and boots and bar abduction treatment. Therefore, about 60 years after its implementation in Iowa it can be said to be the worldwide golden standard. It is know...
Source: Zeitschrift fur Orthopadie und Unfallchirurgie - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Z Orthop Unfall Source Type: research
ConclusionSpndyloarthritis should be considered in FMF patients with associated sacroiliitis especially when there are leading symptoms and/or imaging abnormalities in the spine. Awareness of this co-existence is important among rheumatologsits for a timely and precise management plan.
Source: The Egyptian Rheumatologist - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The efficacy of conservative treatment has been documented in high-quality clinical trials, while that of surgical treatment has not. The various surgical methods have yielded benefits in routine clinical use, but these remain to be assessed in randomized and controlled trials. PMID: 29739493 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Deutsches Arzteblatt International - Category: General Medicine Tags: Dtsch Arztebl Int Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: It is feasible to implement an expanded scope of physiotherapy service in a regional hospital ED. For sustainability in regional areas, a larger advanced-level physiotherapy workforce and easier access to expanded-scope training are required. PMID: 29614863 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Rural and Remote Health - Category: Rural Health Tags: Rural Remote Health Source Type: research
Conclusion Spndyloarthritis should be considered in FMF patients with associated sacroiliitis especially when there are leading symptoms and/or imaging abnormalities in the spine. Awareness of this co-existence is important among rheumatologsits for a timely and precise management plan.
Source: The Egyptian Rheumatologist - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
Courtesy of many influences in pain management practice, you’d have to have been hiding under a rock or maybe be some sort of dinosaur not to have noticed the increasing emphasis on using questionnaires to measure factors such as pain catastrophising, depression or avoidance. The problem is I’m not sure we’ve all been certain about what to do with the results. It’s not uncommon for me to hear people saying “Oh but once I see psychosocial factors there, I just refer on”, or “they’re useful when the person’s not responding to my treatment, but otherwise…”, &l...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Assessment Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping strategies Occupational therapy Physiotherapy Psychology Science in practice biopsychosocial goal-setting healthcare pain management Therapeutic approaches treatment Source Type: blogs
This article gives an overview on epidemiology, risk factors, diagnostic, therapy and prevention.
Source: Sports Orthopaedics and Traumatology - Category: Sports Medicine Source Type: research
The patellar tendon connects the kneecap to the tibia (Figure 1). The patella facilitates the function of the quadriceps to straighten the knee. Patellar tendonitis is often referred to as "jumper's knee". It is an overuse condition that usually occurs in sports athletes who perform repetitive jumping activities. Patellar tendonitis commonly causes pain in the inferior patella area just below the knee cap and affects about 20% of jumping athletes (Figure 2). Jumper's knee can occur above the patella, below the patella, or at the tendon insertion into the tibia. The most common area for patellar tendonit...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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