Impact of the Opioid Epidemic on Lung Transplantation: Donor, Recipient and Discard Characteristics.

CONCLUSIONS: Rates of ODD utilization in lung transplantation have increased in accordance with the opioid epidemic, but there remains a significant pool of ODD pulmonary allografts with favorable characteristics that are discarded. With no significant difference in survival between ODD and non-ODD recipients, further expansion of this donor pool may be appropriate and pulmonary allografts should not be discarded based solely on ODD status. PMID: 31323210 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Ann Thorac Surg Source Type: research

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ConclusionsRates of ODD utilization in lung transplantation have increased in accordance with the opioid epidemic, but there remains a significant pool of ODD pulmonary allografts with favorable characteristics that are discarded. With no significant difference in survival between ODD and non-ODD recipients, further expansion of this donor pool may be appropriate and pulmonary allografts should not be discarded based solely on ODD status.
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
This study compared donor and recipient characteristics, outcomes, and reasons for organ discard between overdose-death donors (ODDs) and donors with all other mechanism of death.MethodsData on adult cardiac transplants from 2010 to 2017 were provided by the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. Cardiac allografts used in multiple organ transplantations were excluded. Recipient and donor characteristics and organ discard were analyzed with regard to ODDs. Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests described mortality survival.ResultsA total of 1,710 of 15,904 (10.8%) cardiac transplantations were from ODDs, approximate...
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
We present an approach to characterizing the epidemiology, policy and resource environment for OUD and its consequences, with a focus on eleven rural counties in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Vermont between 2014 and 2018. We developed health policy summaries and logic models to facilitate comparison of opioid epidemic-related polices across the three states that could influence the risk environment and access to services. We assessed sociodemographic factors, rates of overdose and infectious complications tied to OUD, and drive-time access to prevention and treatment resources. We developed GIS maps and conducted spati...
Source: Preventive Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Kishore and colleagues in NEJM, including Josiah Rich from a university well known to me, discuss the harm reduction approach to injection drug use (IDU). Basically, this means using evidence to guide practice so as to minimize as much as possible the adverse public health consequences of addiction. In addition to the risk of overdose, which is getting most of the attention nowadays, IDU is a means of transmission of Hepatitis C and HIV, and contaminated needles transmit other common infectious organisms that can result in abscesses, and very serious consequences such as myocarditis.So, assuring that users have access to s...
Source: Stayin' Alive - Category: American Health Source Type: blogs
Conclusion
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs
THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 -- Add another hardship to the many already triggered by the opioid epidemic: More donated organs infected with the hepatitis C virus. " The ongoing U.S. opioid crisis has resulted in an increase in drug overdose deaths and...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
Robert R. Redfield, M.D., director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), will deliver the 2018 Joseph J. Kinyoun Memorial Lecture on the intersection between the national opioid crisis and the management of infectious diseases. Titled, “ Opioids: Epidemic of Our Time and Impact on Infectious Disease, ” Dr. Redfield ’ s talk will explore the impacts of the unprecedented use of opioids in the United States on the management of infectious diseases. While overdose remains the leading cause of death among people who use opioids, this population is also disproportionately affected by viral he...
Source: Videocast - All Events - Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video
The US is currently experiencing an opioid epidemic that has officially been declared a “public health emergency” (Gostin et al., 2017). There are multiple components to this epidemic, including excessive marketing, over-prescription and diversion of opioid analgesics, transitions from opioid analgesic use to heroin use, and transitions from oral and intranasal drug use to injectin g drug use. The increase in overdose deaths, from 17,415 in 2000 to 63,632 in 2016 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2018; Hedegaard et al., 2017) may be the most dramatic indicator of the seriousness of this epidemic.
Source: Drug and Alcohol Dependence - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Full length article Source Type: research
Describes the work of two mobile clinics in the Ohio Valley working to help minimize the harm caused by the opioid epidemic. One provides education about the use of naloxone, teaching people how to help a person who has overdosed on opioids, as well as distributing naloxone. The other offers needle-cleaning kits, testing for hepatitis C, and refers people to other health services in their area. Using a mobile clinic allows these programs to reach rural people who might not have the ability to travel for these services.
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - Category: Rural Health Source Type: news
NEW YORK (AP) — One type of superbug bacteria is increasingly spreading among people who inject drugs, according to a new government report. Users of heroin and other injection drugs were 16 times more likely than other people to develop severe illnesses from MRSA, said the report published Thursday. "Drug use has crept up and now accounts for a substantial proportion of these very serious infections," said Dr. William Schaffner of Vanderbilt University, one of the study's authors. The U.S. is in the midst of its deadliest drug epidemic ever. While overdose deaths have been the main concern, some studies ha...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news
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