Maternal immunization in Malawi: A mixed methods study of community perceptions, programmatic considerations, and recommendations for future planning.

CONCLUSIONS: Lessons from the successful delivery of maternal tetanus immunization in Malawi may be informative for similar countries considering new vaccines for pregnant women or striving to optimize the delivery of those currently provided. PMID: 31319932 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research

Related Links:

ConclusionsAlthough maternal Tdap and influenza vaccination coverage increased substantially from 2010 to 2017 among large, geographically diverse U.S. cohorts, coverage remained suboptimal, potentially putting newborns at risk of pertussis and influenza. Strategies to increase maternal vaccination coverage could target women identified to have a reduced likelihood of vaccination: those who are younger, black, residing in rural areas, with multiple gestation, and a prepregnancy inpatient admission.
Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Abstract Immune status during pregnancy is an important consideration, and all women who are pregnant should be screened for immunity to certain diseases. Women who are pregnant are at higher risk of contracting infections, and many infections can cause serious problems for a growing fetus. For this reason, remaining up-to-date on immunizations throughout life and especially leading up to pregnancy is important. In addition, there are certain vaccines that provide added benefit if given during pregnancy. The Tdap (tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, acellular pertussis) and inactivated influenza vaccines ca...
Source: Pediatric Annals - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Pediatr Ann Source Type: research
In this study, we infected pregnant first parity gilts in their first, second and third trimesters of gestation with PEDV to determine the impact of stage of gestation on generation of maternal B-cell immunity, the gut-MG-sIgA axis and lactogenic immune protection in PEDV challenged piglets. Our goal was to identify innate and adaptive immune factors during pregnancy that influence lymphocyte trafficking, in addition to immune correlates of lactogenic immune protection in neonatal suckling piglets. Understanding the impact of stage of gestation at PEDV infection or exposure on maternal immunity will allow more precise mate...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Inactivated influenza vaccine and diphtheria-tetanus acellular pertussis vaccine are routinely recommended during pregnancy to protect women and their babies from infection. Additionally, the hepatitis B vaccine is recommended for infants within the first week of life; however, little is known about midwives ’ experiences of recommending and delivering these immunisations.
Source: Women and Birth - Category: Midwifery Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Sampled OBGYN were largely favorable towards vaccination of pregnant women. As knowledge of official recommendations was identified as a main predictor of appropriate behavior at least for Tdap practice, future educational interventions could eventually improve immunization rates. PMID: 30938116 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Minerva Ginecologica - Category: OBGYN Tags: Minerva Ginecol Source Type: research
This article reviews the current recommendations for vaccination of women during pregnancy. PMID: 30913173 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The provision of immunisation training within midwifery education and continued professional development is critical. Appropriately resourcing midwives with the necessary infrastructure, education and resources to fully inform parents about immunisation may have a positive impact on vaccine uptake. PMID: 30853352 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Women Birth - Category: Midwifery Authors: Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research
The objectives were to assess, among a national sample of obstetrician-gynecologists, practices related to vaccine delivery in non-pregnant patients and factors associated with stocking and administering more than three different vaccines to non-pregnant patients.MethodsE-mail and mail surveys were administered July–October 2015, with analyses performed during October–November 2015 and April–June 2018.ResultsThe response rate was 73% (353/482). Human papillomavirus (92%); influenza (82%); and tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis vaccines (50%) were the vaccines most commonly assessed, with the remaini...
Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Abstract Despite recommendations for vaccinating adults and widespread availability of immunization services (e.g., pharmacy venues, workplace wellness clinics), vaccination rates in the United States remain low. The U.S. National Adult Immunization Plan identified the development of quality measures as a priority and key strategy to address low adult vaccination coverage rates. The use of quality measures can provide incentives for increased utilization of preventive services. To address the lack of adult immunization measures, the National Adult and Influenza Immunization Summit, a coalition of adult immunizatio...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 -- Pregnant women commonly refuse vaccines, including influenza vaccine and tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine, according to research published online Dec. 4 in Obstetrics&...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
More News: Allergy & Immunology | Influenza | Influenza Vaccine | International Medicine & Public Health | Lessons | Malawi Health | Pregnancy | Study | Tetanus | Tetanus Vaccine | Vaccines | Women