From Waking Up to Planting a Flag on the Moon, Here ’s How the Apollo 11 Astronauts Spent July 20, 1969

The triumph of the astronauts, especially Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins, was more than a victory for the United States, but instead a victorious moment for all mankind and no other moment will seem as big until we reach beyond the moon for other planets, other stars. The following is an excerpt from Apollo 11: An AP Special Anniversary Edition, available in paperback and e-book exclusively on Amazon.com. On the eve of history, perhaps men do not sleep well, or perhaps they are not meant to. Before they slept Saturday night, their rest period was delayed an hour-and-a-half because of a pesky communications problem, finally tracked down. They were awakened at 7:02 a.m. Sunday, Armstrong with five-and-a-half hours sleep, Collins with six, Aldrin with five. It was the shortest rest period of the flight. They spent half an hour on breakfast. Mission Control beamed up the latest on their families, and the morning news. Aldrin was told his son had a visit to the space center with an uncle. Then it was time to get down to business. Aldrin was the first into the Eagle at 9:20 a.m. Almost an hour later, Armstrong slipped through the tunnel to join him. From then on, they were Eagle. Collins was Columbia. At 12:32 p.m., they pushed a button that extended the landing legs of Eagle. Thus did Columbia and Eagle, still linked together, arrive at this incredible time and place, out of sight and out of radio contact with earth on their 13th orbit of the moon. Some 100 hours...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized apollo1150 Space Source Type: news

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This study uses interviews (qualitative) to collect data from women technology librarians who work in an academic library within the United States.Research limitations/implicationsThe generalizability of the findings is due to the sample consisting of only academic librarians within the United States. The methodology also has limitations since interviews are not a perfect methodology and rely on self-reported descriptions and experiences; thus, may be susceptible to perceptional biases. The findings from the research also rely only on the gender variable while ignoring other variables that affect an individual's experience...
Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship - Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: research
ConclusionHM might have some beneficial effects including improving insomnia, blood pressure, and mental health, for hypertensive elderly with insomnia. Since the methodological quality of the included studies and QoE were not high, well-designed RCTs are urgent to confirm these results.
Source: European Journal of Integrative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
The New York Times Magazine recently released its “1619 Project,” an initiative marking the 400th anniversary of the first African slaves arriving in North America. The project is ambitious, aiming to “reframe the country’s history, understanding 1619 as our true founding.” A collection of pundits have framed this project as an attempt to “delegimitize” the United States. Such commentary provides an opportunity to consider the state of American race relations and the role of slavery in American history. Whether or not the foundation of the United States was legitimate is an in...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
We have seen that Genesis is a conglomeration of stories and fragments from various sources. Most of it likely existed in some form as pre-literate oral tradition before being written down. These have been stitched together into the semblance of a historical narrative, but it's filled with continuity errors, contradictions, impossibilities and absurdities, multiple versions of the same story, omissions and elisions, gratuitous factoids. The story of Joseph, as we noted, seems more coherent and better crafted than most of what has gone before. It was likely the thoughtful creation of a relatively skilled author, rather than...
Source: Stayin' Alive - Category: American Health Source Type: blogs
You're reading How Stress Damages Your Health, plus Ways to Build Up Your Resilience, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. "The human capacity for burden is like bamboo - far more flexible than you'd ever believe at first glance." - Jodi Picoult The life I live often results in hearing things like "I could never do [that]" or "I don't know how you [do it]." My response is typically a laugh followed by something like, "I don't know how I do it either." As my focus for my ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: career featured health and fitness self improvement damage pickthebrain resilience stress Source Type: blogs
The biggest tech event of the year, CES brought stunning new health technologies to the stage in 2017 as well. Let me show you the most promising new gadgets, sensors and wearables in medicine! CES &the latest trends in tech innovation For geeks and gadget-lovers the year does not usually start with the 1st January, but a couple of days later, when CES opens in Las Vegas. It is even more exciting this year, since the exhibition celebrates its 50th anniversary – so it is obviously bigger and better than ever before. It’s almost impossible to collect and analyse every novelty appearing at the fair, and I&rsqu...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers ces digital health future gc3 health technology Innovation Medicine 2.0 Personalized medicine wearables Source Type: blogs
This article first appeared on QuietRev.com Last year, I decided to make a massive career change: I would stop writing, and I would become a nurse. The decision was simpler than the process. To pass the entrance exam for nursing school, this Art and Theater major had to pull out all the stops in the math and science departments. I knew it would take some doing. And I guessed (rightly) that I couldn’t do it alone. So, I shoved my usual introvert ways to the side, and, readers, I hustled. I declared my intention loud and clear to the universe—i.e., Facebook. I networked with as many nurse friends as I could track...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
We are pioneers in a new world -- the digital world. As we seek to plant flags on new tech summits, it is important to be aware of the health risks involved in navigating this unknown and rocky terrain. Technology-induced accidents notwithstanding, the gadgets have already produced a variety of physical and mental maladies among the general public, which have been unknown or hitherto restricted to specific occupations. Living and working in the digital world entails long hours of sitting in one position, and requires movement of no part of the body other than the fingers. Such sedentary lifestyle is known to cause metab...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Cross-posted from Thought Catalog. If you read a lot or are someone who gets a lot done, people will assume two things. One, that you're a speed reader. Two, that you never sleep. In my experience, neither of those assumptions are true. Or at least, they don't need to be. There's no trick to reading a lot. But more importantly, no one can skimp on sleep--not for long anyway. The philosopher and writer Arthur Schopenhauer used to say that "sleep is the source of all health and energy." He said it better still on a separate occasion: "Sleep is the interest we have to pay on the capital which is called in at de...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
I was privileged to receive an honorary doctoral degree from Quinnipiac University this weekend, and to deliver the commencement address for the Graduate Programs in the Health Sciences. Here, more or less, is what I said. Do not go gentle into that good night, Old age should burn and rave at close of day; Rage, rage against the dying of the light. Though wise men at their end know dark is right, Because their words had forked no lightning they Do not go gentle into that good night. Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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