Vaginal-perineal cultures for detecting group B streptococci and extended spectrum β-lactamase producing bacteria in pregnancy

ConclusionsThe GBS detection rate of the vagino-perineal swab was lower compared to the reference standard. However, agreement between the two screening methods was high and there were no cases of GBS neonatal sepsis in the recruited population, supporting this less invasive screening strategy. In contrast, the vaginal-perineal swab was inferior to the rectal swab for detecting ESBL-E, indicating that this less invasive method for detecting antibiotic resistant bacteria that may be potentially transferred to the neonate during labor and delivery would be inappropriate for ESBL-E screening in pregnant women. The low ESBL-E carriage rate among pregnant women likely reflects the prevalence in the general population.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

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Chances are, you or someone you know is one of the 10% of Americans with a documented penicillin allergy. But just because you were told you had a penicillin allergy, or had one in the past, does not mean you have one now. People with a penicillin allergy history have their allergy disproved with allergy testing more than 90% of the time. Penicillin: a primer Penicillin is part of a larger drug class called beta-lactam antibiotics, which include the common penicillins and cephalosporins. Common penicillins include ampicillin, amoxicillin, and Augmentin. Among other uses, penicillins are often used to treat ear infections, ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Allergies Health Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs
Conclusion The increase in antimicrobial resistance towards drugs used to treat gonorrhoea is reaching a critical stage, especially given how common the infection is worldwide, with an estimated 78 million new cases in 2012. This study raises concerns around an important topic while also proposing strategies to help address the slow pace of research and development of new drugs. The prevention of gonorrhoea is equally, if not more, important. The most effective way to prevent gonorrhoea is to always use a condom during sex, including anal and oral sex. Read more advice about sexually transmitted infections and how to prev...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication QA articles Source Type: news
Abstract PROBLEM/CONDITION: Gonorrhea is the second most commonly reported notifiable disease in the United States; 350,062 gonorrhea cases were reported in 2014. Sexually transmitted infections caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae are a cause of pelvic inflammatory disease in women, which can lead to serious reproductive complications including tubal infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain. Prevention of sequelae and of transmission to sexual partners relies largely on prompt detection and effective antimicrobial treatment. However, treatment has been compromised by the absence of routine antimicrobial...
Source: MMWR Surveill Summ - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Surveill Summ Source Type: research
Conclusion This is an important study that may mean doctors need to change the way they treat one of the most common childhood illnesses. Because urine infections can be painful and can damage the kidneys in young children, it's important they are treated quickly and effectively. Current guidelines for doctors, which were published nine years ago, say children over three months of age with urine infections should be treated for three days with an antibiotic "directed by locally developed guidance", which might include trimethoprim, nitrofurantoin, cephalosporin or amoxicillin. Only if the antibiotic does not w...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Pregnancy/child Source Type: news
Part Three in a Three-Part Series   This is the third and final part of our series on foreign bodies and fluoroscopy. Click here for part one and here for part two.   This month, we walk you through a step-by-step guide with bonus video footage to aid in your technique. This progressive procedure is absolutely significant to your practice, and we hope you all get a chance to try it.     The Approach n        Identification of foreign body on plain film or ultrasound n         Saphenous or posterior tibial nerve block...
Source: The Procedural Pause - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: Osteomyelitis in pregnancy is a rare complication and a challenging diagnosis that requires a high index of suspicion. The treatment of osteomyelitis in pregnancy versus nonpregnancy is the same. This case is unique because this pregnant patient developed osteomyelitis secondary to a vulvar abscess. PMID: 26380498 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Source: Journal of Reproductive Medicine - Category: Reproduction Medicine Tags: J Reprod Med Source Type: research
This study took a sample from healthy pregnant patients (n=760) at different stages of gestation. They found, unsurprisingly, that d-dimer increases with gestational age, congruent with limited prior literature. They propose a continuous increasing d-dimer in pregnancy. With PE experts such as Dr. Kline proposing gestation adjusted d-dimer, this is a research space to watch. Recommended by: Lauren Westafer Systems and administration Del Portal DA, et al. Impact of an Opioid Prescribing Guideline in the Acute Care Setting. J Emerg Med 2015. PMID: 26281819 As many EDs implement voluntary opioid prescribing guidelines, this...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Anaesthetics Cardiology Education Emergency Medicine Haematology Intensive Care critical care literature R&R in the FASTLANE recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs
Penicillin allergy? It’s associated with increased bad outcomes, but not for the reasons you think. The allergies themselves are mostly not allergies. And no, “my mother said I had a rash when I was a baby” isn’t an allergy. However, when compared with patients who don’t have penicillin “allergies”, patients with penicillin allergies have longer hospital stays and are between 14% and 30% more likely to get resistant infections while in the hospitals – possibly because the penicillin “allergic” patients are being treated with much stronger antibiotics that kil...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs
In a beige conference room in Morgantown, West Virginia, Katie Chiasson-Downs, a slight, blond woman with a dimpled smile, read out the good news first. "Sarah is getting married next month, so I expect her to be a little stressed," she said to the room. "Rebecca is moving along with her pregnancy. This is Betty's last group with us.""Felicia is having difficulties with doctors following up with her care for what she thinks is MRSA," Chiasson-Downs continued. "Charlie wasn't here last time, he cancelled. Hank ...""Hank needs a sponsor, bad," said Carl Sullivan, a middle-age...
Source: Psychology of Pain - Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs
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