Discovering the in vitro potent inhibitors against Babesia and Theileria parasites by repurposing the Malaria Box: A review

Publication date: Available online 19 July 2019Source: Veterinary ParasitologyAuthor(s): Mohamed Abdo Rizk, Shimaa Abd El-Salam El-Sayed, Sabry El-Khodery, Naoaki Yokoyama, Ikuo IgarashiAbstractThere is an innovative approach to discovering and developing novel potent and safe anti-Babesia and anti-Theileria agents for the control of animal piroplasmosis. Large-scale screening of 400 compounds from a Malaria Box (a treasure trove of 400 diverse compounds with antimalarial activity has been established by Medicines for Malaria Venture) against the in vitro growth of bovine Babesia and equine Babesia and Theileria parasites was performed, and the data were published in a brief with complete dataset from 236 screens of the Malaria Box compounds. Therefore, in this review, we explored and discussed in detail the in vitro inhibitory effects of 400 antimalarial compounds (200 drug-like and 200 probe-like) from the Malaria Box against Babesia (B.) bovis, B. bigemina, B. caballi, and Theileria (T.) equi. Seventeen hits were the most interesting with regard to bovine Babesia parasites, with mean selectivity indices (SIs) greater than 300 and half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50s) ranging from 50 to 410 nM. The most interesting compounds with regard to equine Babesia and Theileria parasites were MMV020490 and MMV020275, with mean SIs> 258.68 and> 251.55, respectively, and IC50s ranging from 76 to 480 nM. Ten novel anti–B. bovis, anti–B. bigemina, ...
Source: Veterinary Parasitology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research

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Babesiosis represents a veterinary and medical threat, with a need for novel drugs. Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT) have been successfully implemented for malaria, a human disease caused by relat...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: J Med Microbiol Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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Source: Veterinary Parasitology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
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Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs
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Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs
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