The effect of modifiable risk factors on breast cancer aggressiveness among black and white women

Publication date: Available online 18 July 2019Source: The American Journal of SurgeryAuthor(s): Brigid K. Killelea, Emily J. Gallagher, Sheldon M. Feldman, Elisa Port, Tari King, Susan K. Boolbol, Rebeca Franco, Kezhen Fei, Derek Le Roith, Nina A. BickellAbstractIntroductionAlthough breast cancer incidence is higher among white women, black women are more likely to have aggressive tumors with less favorable histology, and to have a worse prognosis. Obesity and alcohol consumption have been identified as two modifiable risk factors for breast cancer, while physical activity may offer protection. Little however is known about the association of these factors with race on the severity of breast cancer.MethodsData collected as part of a large prospective study looking at insulin resistance and race among women with breast cancer was queried for patient characteristics, lifestyle factors and tumor characteristics. The association with Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) was assessed with different models using univariate and multivariate linear regression.ResultsAmong 746 women in our cohort, 82% (n=615) were white and 18% (n=131) were black, mean age 58 years. Black patients were more likely to have high BMI (31.0 vs. 26.7, p
Source: The American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research

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The aim of the study was to describe changes in health behaviours and BMI after breast cancer diagnosis, depicting the potential influence of sociodemographic, clinical and psychological characteristics. A total of 428 breast cancer patients were prospectively followed for 3 years, since diagnosis. At the end of follow-up, women were classified regarding their adherence to recommendations for cancer prevention, prediagnosis and after 3 years, including not smoking, alcohol consumption up to one drink per day, intake of at least five portions per day of fruits and/or vegetables, physical activity and body mass index (BMI) l...
Source: European Journal of Cancer Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Research Papers: Breast Cancer Source Type: research
By Nina Avramova, CNN (CNN) — Sleep traits could be a risk factor for breast cancer, new research suggests. Women who said they preferred to get out of bed early were found to have a lower risk of breast cancer than those who stay up late. However, experts cautioned that other breast cancer risk factors such as alcohol consumption and being overweight have a greater impact than sleep and said there was no reason to change your sleep patterns. One out of 100 women who considered themselves morning people developed breast cancer, compared with two in 100 women who described themselves as evening people, according ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Breast Cancer CNN Source Type: news
Prevention is often called the best medicine — but research has shown that millions of Americans are not getting the preventive care they should to live long, healthy lives. Obstacles like inadequate access to care and financial barriers can keep people away from the doctor, but anxiety and feeling like care is unnecessary are also common deterrents. “There are a lot of things that every person could do to stay healthy, and this could help people to feel better, improve their quality of life and help them to live longer,” says Dr. Alex Krist, a professor of family medicine at Virginia Commonwealth Univer...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Longevity public health Source Type: news
Lindsay T. McDonald1,2*, Marcelo F. Lopez3,4, Kristi L. Helke2,5,6, M.A. McCrackin1,5, James J. Cray Jr.7, Howard C. Becker1,3,4 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2,81Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States4Charleston Alcohol Research Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States5Department of Comparativ...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusion The periconceptional environment and lifestyle factors modify sperm epigenome. This alteration might be maintained in the zygote and throughout development, thereby leading to the inheritance of newly acquired pathologies. The role of sperm miRNA, not only as innovative markers of fertility issues but also as vectors involved in the inheritance of paternal diseases, appears to be crucial. Overweight and obesity seem to alter sperm miRNA profile, thereby leading to transmission of different miRNA profiles in zygote, with consequences on embryo development. In long term, metabolic disorders have been described in...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
In this study, we found that the activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and mineralized nodules in MC3T3-E1 cells were both significantly increased after treatment with AG (5, 10, and 20 μM). Meanwhile, the mRNA and protein levels of osteoblastic marker genes in MC3T3-E1 cells after AG treatment were markedly increased compared with a control group. In addition, the levels of BMP-2, p-Smad1/5/9, and Runx2 were significantly elevated in AG-treated MC3T3-E1 cells. Moreover, we found that the protein levels of Erk1/2, p-Erk1/2, p38, p-p38, and p-JNK were also significantly increased in AG-treated MC3T3-E1 cells compared ...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Bariatric surgery appears to be capable of partially reversing the obesity-related epigenome. The identification of potential epigenetic biomarkers predictive for the success of bariatric surgery may open new doors to personalized therapy for severe obesity. Introduction Obesity is currently a huge healthcare problem, worldwide, and is a risk factor for several diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular disease and cancer (1). As the prevalence of obesity reaches pandemic proportions, this metabolic disease is estimated to become the biggest cause of mortality in the near future (2). In fact,...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeThe American Cancer Society (ACS) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) each created dietary and physical activity guidelines to improve cancer survivorship. Despite African American breast cancer survivors (AABCS) having the lowest survival rates of any racial or ethnic group, limited information exists on their adherence to cancer-specific lifestyle recommendations. The study ’s purpose was to measure adherence to ACS/AICR dietary recommendations in AABCS.MethodsTwo hundred ten AABCS enrolled in the Moving Forward intervention trial, a randomized, community-based, 6-month weight loss ...
Source: Journal of Cancer Survivorship - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
We presented a new statistic T to use large public database as reference to reduce concern of potential population stratification. And the new statistic proposed here is effective to discover novel genome-wide significant loci with both small and large sample sizes. Author Contributions YW conceived the idea and developed the software. YL, MH, and XL contributed data analysis, generating tables and figures, and manuscript writing. YW, YL, MH, XL, YS, and LJ contributed the theoretical analysis and manuscript revision. MX helped support the GWAS datasets. YW, YL, MH, XL, MZ, JW, and MX contributed to scientific discussion...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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