Use of Transnasal Rapid-Insufflation Ventilatory Exchange (THRIVE) to facilitate the management of subglottic stenosis in pregnancy

Subglottic stenosis is characterised by narrowing of the lower larynx and upper trachea. Conventional intubation can be impossible, whilst in the parturient the anatomical and physiological changes of pregnancy further complicate management.
Source: International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Case report Source Type: research

Related Links:

Publication date: Available online 20 August 2019Source: Anaesthesia &Intensive Care MedicineAuthor(s): Sophie A. Kimber CraigAbstractRegional anaesthetic techniques are the most frequently used type of anaesthetic used for caesarean deliveries. They have a better safety profile than general anaesthesia in the pregnant woman. The choice of whether to use a spinal, epidural or combined spinal–epidural technique will depend on patient and surgical factors. Particular care is required in those receiving therapeutic anticoagulation or with clotting abnormalities. Women should be provided with information regarding th...
Source: Anaesthesia and intensive care medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
This article summarizes current guidelines in relation to consent that have been updated to reflect recent case law.
Source: Anaesthesia and intensive care medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 19 August 2019Source: Anaesthesia &Intensive Care MedicineAuthor(s): Emma Sharkey, Siân GriffithsAbstractAnaesthesia, surgery and ionizing radiation may all prove harmful to an undetected pregnancy. Elective procedures should be deferred at least until the second trimester to reduce the risk of teratogenicity or spontaneous abortion. If surgery cannot be delayed, anaesthetic or surgical techniques can be modified, and the use of intraoperative ionizing radiation avoided where possible. Determination of pregnancy status is mandated by current national guidelines prior to any proc...
Source: Anaesthesia and intensive care medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
AbstractObjectivesFew studies have investigated the prophylactic efficacy of dexmedetomidine (DEX) in postpartum depressive symptoms (PDS). A randomized, double ‐blind, placebo‐controlled trial was conducted to investigate whether the administration of DEX, immediately after delivery and for patient controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA), can attenuate PDS.MethodsSix hundred parturients scheduled for elective caesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia were randomly allocated into the Control group (infusion with 0.9%normal saline after delivery and PCIA with sufentanil) and the DEX group (DEX infusion 0.5ug.kg‐1 aft...
Source: Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Original Research Article Source Type: research
Neuraxial anesthesia is the standard of care for cesarean delivery and labor analgesia in obstetric patients but can be technically challenging due to the anatomical changes of pregnancy.1 In our tertiary care academic obstetric unit, we have an Epidural Positioning Device (EPD ®, PHS Medical, Watertown, SD, USA), designed to facilitate the sitting flexed position in patients having neuraxial anesthesia. On the product information sheet, the manufacturer of the device claims that the “Epidural Positioning Device positions patients correctly and comfortably by encouragin g cervical, thoracic and lumbar flexion whi...
Source: International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Conditions:   Anesthesia, Spinal;   Pain;   Pregnancy;   Cesarean Section Interventions:   Drug: EMLA cream;   Drug: 2% lidocaine Sponsor:   Aga Khan University Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
We report on our experiences since 2010 with pregnant women with rare blood types. The lack of compatible blood is a challenge for the anaesthetist whose priority is to prevent and treat anaemia in late pregnancy in order to avoid immunisation after transfusion of incompatible blood. In our hospital, the blood type is checked during the first obstetric consult, which is variable, starting from the fourth month of pregnancy. Rare blood types are most often diagnosed in an advanced stage of pregnancy (30 weeks of gestation: WG) due to the late inscription for obstetrics consult, resulting in even later anaesthetic vis...
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Source Type: research
More News: Anesthesia | Anesthesiology | OBGYN | Pregnancy