IL-6 -572G/C and -174G/C polymorphisms association with hepatitis C virus induced hepatocellular carcinoma.

IL-6 -572G/C and -174G/C polymorphisms association with hepatitis C virus induced hepatocellular carcinoma. Br J Biomed Sci. 2019 Jul 17; Authors: Badawy AA, Othman G, Elabbasy LM, Abd Elsalam M, Shrief R, Fahmy EM, Kamel NM, Osman A, Zaki ME PMID: 31314698 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: British Journal of Biomedical Science - Category: Laboratory Medicine Tags: Br J Biomed Sci Source Type: research

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AbstractChronic hepatitis C affects millions of people worldwide and patients born between 1945 and 1965 are at elevated risk. Hepatitis C infection can lead to health complications including liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Recent advancements in direct-acting antiviral treatments have placed the spotlight on primary care providers to identify undiagnosed patients with chronic hepatitis C for treatment and attaining a sustained-virologic response. Primary care providers do not routinely screen patients born between 1945 and 1965 for hepatitis C despite CDC recommendations. To evaluate the effectiveness of a h...
Source: Journal of Community Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Publication date: 19–25 October 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 394, Issue 10207Author(s): C Wendy Spearman, Geoffrey M Dusheiko, Margaret Hellard, Mark SonderupSummaryHepatitis C is a global health problem, and an estimated 71·1 million individuals are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The global incidence of HCV was 23·7 cases per 100 000 population (95% uncertainty interval 21·3–28·7) in 2015, with an estimated 1·75 million new HCV infections diagnosed in 2015. Globally, the most common infections are with HCV genotypes 1 (44% of cases), 3 (25% of cases), ...
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
This study was conducted to clarify the association of SNPS of TLR2 and TLR4 with clinical outcome of hepatitis C, response to treatment and development of HCC. Methods: The current study examined 3295 individuals from 725 families that were categorized into groups comprising chronic HCV (CH), spontaneous viral clearance (SC) and control subjects. Treated patients were classified into responders (RT) and non-responders (NRT). In addition, patients with liver cirrhotic (LC), and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were also included. All subjects were genotyped for five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of TLR2 and four SNP...
Source: Immunological Investigations - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Immunol Invest Source Type: research
Authors: Kawaguchi T, Ide T, Kondo R, Nomura Y, Arinaga-Hino T, Kuwahara R, Amano K, Sano T, Akiba J, Ohshima K, Yano H, Torimura T Abstract Although the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) occurring after hepatitis C virus (HCV) eradication has decreased, there are still reports of hepatocarcinogenesis. The present study investigated the histological changes of non-cancerous liver tissue obtained prior to interferon (IFN) therapy and after HCC development. A total of 669 HCV-infected Japanese patients who achieved sustained virological response (SVR) by IFN-based therapy were retrospectively enrolled. Of t...
Source: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine - Category: General Medicine Tags: Exp Ther Med Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 16 October 2019Source: Journal of the Formosan Medical AssociationAuthor(s): Shih-Jer Hsu, Sheng-Shun Yang, Jia-Horng KaoAlthough interferon (IFN)-based therapy has been shown to reduce hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development once patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection achieve sustained virologic response (SVR), IFN-based therapy is limited by its multiple adverse effects, non-oral administration, and unsatisfactory SVR rate. In recent years, IFN-free all-oral direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have replaced IFN-based therapy as the standard of care for HCV infection worl...
Source: Journal of the Formosan Medical Association - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Direct-acting antivirals (DAA) have become the new standard of care for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, demonstrating to be highly effective in achieving sustained virological response (SVR) rates regardless of HCV-genotype. Due to their safety profile and low side effects any patient in any stage of chronic liver disease (from mild fibrosis to decompensated cirrhosis) can be treated with DAA [1]. Therefore, it is important to know which patients will be prone to develop liver-related complications, such hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver decompensation, and will need a lifelong follow up and ...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 16 October 2019Source: Life SciencesAuthor(s): Abdo A. Elfiky, Alaa IsmailAbstractAimTo work on Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), one of the major causes of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, polymerase of genotype 4a that have no solved structures deposited in the protein data bank (PDB) yet. Understanding the dynamics and testing some novel inhibitors are also covered.Materials and methodsMolecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS) is performed for a period of 1 μs on comparatively modeled then validated NS5b of subtype 4a. Following MDS analysis, molecular docking is performed to test t...
Source: Life Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research
Abstract Although interferon (IFN)-based therapy has been shown to reduce hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development once patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection achieve sustained virologic response (SVR), IFN-based therapy is limited by its multiple adverse effects, non-oral administration, and unsatisfactory SVR rate. In recent years, IFN-free all-oral direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have replaced IFN-based therapy as the standard of care for HCV infection worldwide because of the higher SVR rate and lower incidence of adverse effects. By using currently approved DAA regimens, HCV can be eradicat...
Source: J Formos Med Assoc - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: J Formos Med Assoc Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Sofosbuvir may be used as an option for treatment against YFV until other drugs are identified and approved for human use. These results offer insights into the role of nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) in YFV inhibition and suggest that nonstructural proteins may be explored as drug targets for YFV treatment. PMID: 31594756 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Ann Hepatol Source Type: research
virus (HCV) is a major public health problem and a leading cause of chronic liver disease. Over 150 million people worldwide have chronic HCV infection and are at risk of developing its life-threatening complications. Acute infection is usually asymptomatic, with most patients unaware that they have contracted the virus. Some patients clear the virus spontaneously, but most become chronic carriers. If carriers are identified, they can be treated with antiviral therapy, the main goal being prevention of cirrhosis, liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma by eradicating the virus.
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Liver infections Source Type: research
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