Systems Analyses of the Immune Response to the Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

Condition:   Healthy Volunteer Interventions:   Biological: Flucelvax;   Biological: Fluvirin;   Biological: Fluzone High Dose Sponsor:   National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials

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Wondering when to get your flu shot? The best time is before influenza (flu) starts circulating widely. For most people, September or October is ideal for protection through the whole flu season, as the immune response from the vaccine wanes over time. And while changes and restrictions due to COVID-19 may make getting a flu vaccine less convenient for some this year, the pandemic makes it more important than ever. Why do I need to get a flu vaccine yearly? Influenza A and Influenza B cause most cases of flu in humans. Both have many strains that constantly change, accumulating genetic mutations that disguise them from the...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Cold and Flu Coronavirus and COVID-19 Vaccines Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 12 September 2020Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Laurie A. Housel, Thomas A. Beltran, Christina Spooner, Limone C. Collins, Daniel F. Ewing, Maya Williams, Bruce M. McClenathan
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Abstract Infection is the predominant cause of mortality in early life, and immunization is the most promising biomedical intervention to reduce this burden. However, very young infants fail to respond optimally to most vaccines currently in use, especially neonates. In 2005, Stanley Plotkin proposed that new delivery systems would spur a new revolution in pediatric vaccinology, just as attenuation, inactivation, cell culture of viruses, genetic engineering, and adjuvantation had done in preceding decades. Recent advances in the field of immunoengineering, which is evolving alongside vaccinology, have begun to inc...
Source: Pediatric Research - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Pediatr Res Source Type: research
The cleverest of enemies thrive on surprise attacks. Viruses—and coronaviruses in particular—know this well. Remaining hidden in animal hosts for decades, they mutate steadily, sometimes serendipitously morphing into more effective and efficient infectious agents. When a strain with just the right combination of genetic codes that spell trouble for people makes the leap from animal to human, the ambush begins. Such was the case with SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus behind COVID-19, and the attack was mostly silent and insidious at first. Many people infected with SARS-CoV-2 remained oblivious as they served as the v...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news
Conditions:   Influenza;   Respiratory Tract Infections Interventions:   Behavioral: Portal Reminders for Influenza Vaccination: Direct scheduling link;   Behavioral: Portal Reminders for Influenza Vaccination: No direct scheduling link;   Behavioral: Pre-Commitment Prompt;   Behavioral: Pre-Appointment flu vaccine reminders Sponsors:   University of California, Los Angeles;   National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
You could help prevent a “twindemic” of influenza and Covid-19, they say. Doctors have specific advice for people over 65, pregnant women and those with egg allergies. Here’s what you need to know.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Vaccination and Immunization Influenza Content Type: Service United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Source Type: news
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