Study Casts Doubt on Safety of Herbal Drug Kratom

Kratom, made from the leaves of a Southeast Asian plant, is usually used to treat pain and addiction. But poison control center data shows it has been tied to seizures, withdrawal, hallucinations, agitation and rapid heart rate, researchers report.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Pandemics can be indiscriminate, with viruses making no distinctions among the victims they attack and those they spare. If you’re human, you’ll do. COVID-19 has been different, particularly when it comes to age. The disease has shown a special animus for older people, with those 65-plus considered at especially high risk for hospitalization and death, and those 18 and below catching a semblance of an epidemiological break. Though a small share of adolescents have suffered severe cases, most who contract the disease in that age cohort are likelier to experience milder symptoms or none at all. But if COVID-19 is...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
At the dawn of the pandemic, as businesses shuttered and frontline workers braved inadequate conditions and the death toll began to tick frighteningly upward, I was home alone, nursing one selfish obsession: that I would use this time to get in really good shape. I am not proud of this–I would much rather write that I was raising money for communities disproportionately affected by this crisis, or delivering meals to the immunocompromised–but it’s the truth. The more I thought about it, the more the idea sharpened in my mind’s eye: this persistent fantasy of how I would emerge anew once the lockdown...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
Lead may contaminate opium, heroin and illicit opiates and is particularly observed in Iran. Lead, a natural heavy metal is able to interfere with several organ functions after ingestion or inhalation. Lead poisoning manifestations are non-specific and thu...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
  Cannabis, weed, marijuana, pot. It goes by several names, but we all know what it smells like. As weed becomes more mainstream, we on the Not Crazy podcast want to know: Is marijuana really an effective treatment for anxiety? Is it just a coping mechanism? Or a vice? In today’s podcast, Gabe and Jackie look at the research and weigh out the evidence. They also interview Eileen Davidson, a rheumatoid arthritis patient who regularly uses marijuana as a medicine to see what she has to say. What’s your take? Tune in for an open-minded discussion about weed. (Transcript Available Below) SUBSCRIBE &REV...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Medications Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: Intravenous calcium gluconate administration along with morphine can improve abdominal pain in lead poisoning due to the ingestion of lead-contaminated opium. Further interventional studies are recommended to see if response to calcium salts in suspected lead-induced abdominal pain can rule in lead toxicity. TRIAL REGISTRATION: IRCT20171009036661N2. Registered 27 May 2018 - Retrospectively registered. PMID: 32188492 [PubMed - in process]
Source: BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: BMC Pharmacol Toxicol Source Type: research
The last man that used the words “I love you” used them to control me.  He used them by not saying it back, ever, when I said it.  He used them by smugly making me say it when he wanted to hear it.  He used them by only ever saying them himself when I would work up the strength to try to end things.   He used them to make me feel bad when I didn’t “behave” how he wanted me to.  He used them to convince me of a false future that he had no intention of ever providing.  The words “I love you” meant absolutely nothing. They were alternately a crowba...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Codependence Narcissism Personal Stories Relationships & Love Addiction Recovery Alcoholism Breakups Emotional Abuse Substance Abuse Source Type: news
Dana Carpender, friend and author of many low-carb cookbooks, provided this review of my new Revised &Expanded Wheat Belly, below. For more of Dana’s signature wit and conversation, you can join her on her engaging Facebook page “Hold the toast press” or visit her Amazon page that lists all her wonderful low-carb cookbooks. It’s funny how things happen. Nine years ago I had already been eating a low carbohydrate diet for 16 years. During that time I had occasionally eaten low carb tortillas and low carb bread. These things were hardly a staple of my diet, but I kept ’em around for the occ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Open autoimmune joint pain wheat belly Source Type: blogs
AbstractPurpose of ReviewKratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is an herb with no current indication for medical use with potentially addictive properties, yet it is being used in the management of pain, depression, and anxiety. The agent ’s pharmacology lends itself for concern regarding recreational misuse (Drugs of Abuse,2017).Recent FindingsKratom ’s increasing popularity for use in the USA is reflected by National Poison Data System data that in 2011 there were 13 cases reported to poison control centers while in 2017 there were 682 calls in response to kratom exposure (Kratom exposure in the US linked to serious me...
Source: Current Emergency and Hospital Medicine Reports - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
The rising popularity of vaping has been dramatic, especially among teenagers. According to a recent study, about 37% of high school seniors reported vaping in 2018, up from 28% the year before. An estimated 2.1 million middle school and high school students reported using e-cigarettes in 2017; that number jumped to 3.6 million in 2018. Certainly, age restrictions — it’s illegal to sell e-cigarettes to anyone under 21 (18 or 19 in some states) — aren’t preventing use among teens and young adults. And nearly seven million adults 18 or older use e-cigarettes, according to a 2017 survey by the CDC. E-c...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Adolescent health Lung disease Men's Health Smoking cessation Women's Health Source Type: blogs
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating a growing number of “severe” lung disease cases that appear to be related to vaping. Since late June, according to the CDC, 94 people in 14 states have come down with serious lung illnesses that may be linked to use of e-cigarettes, which heat substances including nicotine and cannabis to create aerosols that users inhale. The case count has grown high enough to prompt the CDC to work with state health departments to learn more about what could be causing the worrisome conditions, which are primarily affecting adolescents. Although “mor...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health Source Type: news
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