PMab-247 Detects Bear Podoplanin in Immunohistochemical Analysis.

In this study, immunohistochemical analyses showed that PMab-247 strongly detected bPDPN, which is expressed in type I alveolar cells and lymphatic endothelial cells of bear lung and podocytes of bear kidney. These findings suggest that PMab-247 could be useful for pathophysiological analyses using immunohistochemistry. PMID: 31313968 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Monoclonal Antibodies in Immunodiagnosis and Immunotherapy - Category: Microbiology Tags: Monoclon Antib Immunodiagn Immunother Source Type: research

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Immunology and allergy clinics of north america
Source: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
It has been over a century since Noon and Freeman began injecting allergic patients with allergens.1-4 Their rationale was based on the work of Edward Jenners, who had demonstrated that injecting cow pox conveyed immunity to smallpox. Surprisingly, Noon and Freeman were right. Not only did they “cure” many of their patients, they did not kill any of them. However, they did have to administer epinephrine a few times during “rapid desensitization.” Interesting, they realized early on that “leisurely inoculations” (ie, conventional buildup schedules) were inconvenient for the pati ents and ...
Source: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Foreword Source Type: research
It has been almost one hundred ten years since allergen immunotherapy (AIT) was first recognized as a treatment for allergic diseases by the English physicians, Noon and Freeman. However, it was applied thousands of years earlier. Snake handlers learned that if they swam in snake-infested waters, they would acquire immunity to the cobra ’s venom.1 This was likely the first use of oral immunotherapy (OIT) because the snake-infested waters contained venom, and the snake handlers swallowed it as they swam.
Source: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Preface Source Type: research
This article covers the epidemiology of unexpected allergic reactions to peanut, and outlines definitions of risk and risk reduction with quantitative risk assessment examples. Well-acknowledged future areas of research still exist, especially in the area of longer-term clinical trials or commercial data, which will strengthen the knowledge surrounding risk and potential options for risk reduction in those with peanut allergy.
Source: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
This article reviews research advances for sublingual and patch immunotherapy for food allergy with a focus on peanut allergy. Published studies on sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) and epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT) were summarized in this review. Sublingual and epicutaneous methods have emerged as alternatives to oral immunotherapy. SLIT studies have shown modest desensitization with a robust safety profile. EPIT studies have high adherence rates, an excellent safety profile, and potential for desensitization in children. Advances in food immunotherapy with SLIT and EPIT studies have shown promise as viable alternatives...
Source: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Food allergy prevalence has increased over the past 2  decades and is estimated to affect 8% of children and 4% to 10% of adults. There is an unmet need to evaluate new therapeutic modalities that may decrease the risk of food-induced anaphylaxis and improve patients’ quality of life. Oral, epicutaneous, and sublingual food immunotherapies have diff erent safety and efficacy profiles, and their long-term outcome and applicability are unclear. Food allergy trials are currently evaluating different biologics (given as monotherapy or adjunct to immunotherapy), modified food proteins, DNA vaccines, and fecal microbiota transplantation.
Source: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
This article evaluates the cost-effectiveness of allergy immunotherapy (AIT) in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, asthma, and other allergic conditions. An extensive search of the PubMed and Medline databases (up to December 2018) was conducted. There is strong evidence in the collective literature, which included individual studies and systematic reviews, that AIT is cost-effective in the management of allergic rhinitis and asthma as compared with standard drug treatment alone. The magnitude of AIT ’s cost-effectiveness is likely underestimated because most of the studies considered during-treatment costs and not ...
Source: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) is effective for allergic rhinitis and conjunctivitis, asthma, and insect venom hypersensitivity. The risk of severe allergic reactions induced by SCIT remains low, and mild systemic reactions have recently shown a tendency to decline. However, near-fatal and fatal anaphylactic reactions may occur. Clinicians administering allergen-specific immunotherapy should receive specialized training and be aware of risk factors and preventive measures to avoid severe allergic reactions induced by SCIT.
Source: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
cute;r Katja Vetvik Previously recognized classical human onco-viruses can regulate complex neoplastic events, and are estimated to play a role during carcinogenesis in 15–20% of cancer cases. Although the DNA and gene products of several viruses have been found in breast tumors, none of the classical onco-viruses have definitely been linked to the initiation of breast cancer. However, recent evidence shows that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gene products are found in >90% of tumors and metastases of breast cancers, and their increased expression can be correlated to a more aggressive breast cancer ph...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Nut allergy is a significant burden on the healthcare system, new research confirms, but immunotherapies on the horizon might reduce that.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Allergy & Clinical Immunology News Source Type: news
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