Healthy lifestyle can slash risk of dementia by a third

BRITONS whose genes make them more likely to develop dementia could slash their risk by a third by adopting a healthy lifestyle, a study found. Scientists said the groundbreaking findings challenge the common belief that some people are doomed to develop the condition due to their DNA.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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CONCLUSION: Increased levels of inflammatory markers were not associated with faster progression as measured by the annual change on the CDR-SB or MMSE score. PMID: 31414991 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Scan recipients were willing to accept a treatment with a high risk of death. Discordance was affected by scan recipient's having poorer functioning. PMID: 31414990 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord Source Type: research
Authors: Mancuso R, Sicurella M, Agostini S, Marconi P, Clerici M Abstract Introduction: Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia worldwide, is a multifactorial disease with a still unknown etiology. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) has long been suspected to be one of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Areas covered: We review the literature focusing on viral characteristics of HSV-1, the mechanisms this virus uses to infect neural cells, its interaction with the host immune system and genetic background and summarizes results and research that support the hypothesis of an ass...
Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther Source Type: research
A study of nursing home residents with advanced dementia finds men are more likely to be hospitalized and receive invasive treatment at end of life than women.
Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news
DEMENTIA symptoms can affect people differently as it depends on which part of the brain has been damaged and what type of dementia a person has. Vascular dementia is the second most common type of dementia - so what are the early signs to look out for?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conditions:   Frontotemporal Dementia;   Frontotemporal Degeneration;   Frontotemporal Dementia, Behavioral Variant;   FTD Intervention:   Other: Telephone Interview Sponsors:   Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health;   National Institutes of Health (NIH) Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Conditions:   Alzheimer Dementia;   Caregiver;   Dementia Alzheimers Intervention:   Behavioral: Telephone-delivered Mindfulness Sponsors:   University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill;   National Institute on Aging (NIA) Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
ConclusionThis is the first study suggesting that D-amino acids in blood may be correlated with ADAS-cog in different items and in the opposite direction. Lower D-glutamate and higher D-alanine levels may predict more behavioral symptoms. In summary, D-glutamate, d-serine and D-alanine play different and characteristic roles in AD. Further longitudinal studies are warranted to elucidate the function and interaction of D-amino acids in specific cognitive domains as well as various phases of dementia.
Source: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
Conclusion: Blood transfusion, especially transfusion of any type of red blood cells is associated with an increased risk of dementia.
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: Ethnicity and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: research
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