Malignant phyllodes tumor in Lynch syndrome: a case report

ConclusionsThis case highlights the importance of genetic testing with rare malignancies because the full scope of phenotypic sequelae for known hereditary syndromes has not been mapped.
Source: Journal of Medical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research

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Authors: Michalek J, Brychtova S, Pink R, Dvorak Z Abstract Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a growing problem worldwide. Several biological and molecular criteria have been established for making a prognosis of OSCC. One of the most important factors affecting the risk of tumor recurrence and overall prognosis is perineural invasion and bone invasion. Perineural invasion is defined as a tumor spreading and the ability of tumor cells to penetrate around or through the nerve tissue. Perineural invasion can cause the tumor to spread to distant areas from the primary tumor location. One possible explanation for ...
Source: Biomedical Papers of the Medical Faculty of the Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: Biomed Pap Med Fac Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: CRS/HIPEC performed is a safe method with low perioperative mortality. PMID: 31435073 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Biomedical Papers of the Medical Faculty of the Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: Biomed Pap Med Fac Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub Source Type: research
For men with localized prostate cancer (CaP), radical prostatectomy (RP) as well as radiotherapy (RT) was associated with lower incidences of progression and metastases than was active monitoring.1 Meanwhile, prospective trial showed these patients with a long life expectancy would benefit from surgical intervention with a mean gain of almost 3-year of life.2 Unfortunately, when localized CaP progressed to incurable metastatic disease ancestral subclones and stromal micro-environment evolved dynamically in space and time following principles of selective evolution, underpinning important emergent features such as therapeut...
Source: Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
Retrospective evaluations of the treatment of the primary tumor in the setting of metastatic hormone sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC) are prevalent in the recent literature. The majority of these reports have favored the addition of local therapy1 and form the hypothesis generating support for recently completed and ongoing prospective randomized studies.2,3 Interestingly, in the present retrospective study, cancer-specific survival was not improved with local therapy. This is intriguing since the patients were subject to similar selection biases present in other retrospective reviews favoring local therapy.
Source: Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
The accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for prostate cancer detection has been demonstrated in multiple studies, but the interpretation of prostate MRI can be quite challenging. In particular, changes caused by aging (ie, hyperplasia) or by pathologic conditions such as inflammation or cancer can lead to a nearly singular appearance on MRI for each prostate. Additionally, the lack of robust standardization across MRI scanners hampers the adoption of quantitative parameters for imaging analysis.
Source: Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
Cystoscopic surveillance, as recommended by the American Urology Association and the European Association of Urology guidelines, is the current gold standard for monitoring non –muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC).1,2 For low-risk NMIBC, at low risk of recurrence or progression, these guidelines recommend surveillance cystoscopies at 3 and 12 months, and annually thereafter. Moreover, there is recommendation by some national expert bodies to curtail continual cystosco pic surveillance beyond 12 months in those at lowest risk for recurrence.
Source: Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
The treatment options for metastatic prostate cancer have increased dramatically over the past decade, including novel hormonal therapies, chemotherapies, and radiopharmaceuticals. The administration of myelosuppressive chemotherapies has generally been supervised by medical oncologists in the United States. The oversight of oral agents such as abiraterone  + prednisone (abi) and enzalutamide (enza) has been less well defined. This issue of the Gold Journal describes the increasing role of urologists in prescribing these agents.
Source: Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
The management of patients with prostate cancer, in contrast to that of most other neoplasms is somewhat unique in that care of patients is typically overseen to a variable degree by a variety of different clinicians including urologists, radiation, and medical oncologists over a disease course that may extend over many years.
Source: Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by a significant risk of colorectal and endometrial cancers. A variety of other epithelial cancers may be associated with this syndrome, including ovarian, gastric, small bowel, hepatobiliary, renal, ureteral, skin, breast, prostate, and pancreatic cancers. Brain tumors are infrequent, but have been reported in series [1]. Individuals who have biallelic Lynch syndrome mutations in MLH1, MSH-2, MSH-6, or PMS-2 have a childhood-onset disorder now referred to as constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome, in whic...
Source: Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
This document presents the official recommendations of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Institute on the diagnosis and management of Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome (previously referred to as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome) is the most common heritable colorectal cancer syndrome, accounting for 2% to 3% of colorectal cancers, and has an estimated prevalence in the general population of 1 in 440. Patients with Lynch syndrome have an estimated lifetime cumulative incidence of colorectal cancer up to 80% and endometrial cancer up to 60% and also have increased risks of other cancers, ...
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: AGA Section Source Type: research
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