Supporting a Healthy Microbiome for the Primary Prevention of Eczema

AbstractEczema is increasing worldwide with associated increases in health costs and decreases in quality of life. There are many factors that are speculated to interact in the development of eczema including genetics and environmental exposures. Prevention of the development of eczema may prevent the further development of food allergies and asthma. This concept has prompted a variety of research into the area of primary prevention of eczema in infants. This exploration includes a growing body of research examining infants supplemented with probiotics, prebiotics, or both (synbiotics) often compared with their breastfed counterparts. The goal of this paper is to examine the evidence for manipulating the microbiome in the prevention of eczema. Several strains of probiotics, compositions of prebiotics, and varied combinations of both are commercially available. Evidence supports altering the microbiome in infants at high risk of atopy who are not able to breastfeed withLactobacillus strains when given both prenatally followed by prolonged use (greater than 6  months) postnatally for the primary prevention of eczema. Prebiotics have also been shown beneficial for primary prevention of eczema in formula-fed infants with prolonged use greater than 6 months. These findings are in keeping with the World Allergy Organization (WAO) recommendations that suppo rt interventions to manipulate the microbiome with both probiotics and prebiotics.
Source: Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

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Source: Health News - UPI.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
(MediaSource) Many babies with eczema go on to develop food allergies, asthma and hay fever, and researchers at National Jewish Health say it's not a coincidence. The cracks caused by eczema weaken the skin barrier, allowing allergens to penetrate the skin and cause a sequence of allergic diseases, what experts call the 'atopic march.'
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
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Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Telemedicine & Smartphones dermatology Health Healthcare Innovation patient patient information skin smart health smart healthcare smartphone apps technology Source Type: blogs
Staphylococcus aureus has been implicated in the pathophysiology of eczema, allergic rhinitis, asthma, and food allergy. S aureus is a marker of more severe eczema, which is a risk factor for food sensitization/allergy. Therefore it might be that the association between S aureus and food allergy in eczematous patients is related to eczema severity.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 8 May 2019Source: Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and InfectionAuthor(s): Chih-Yung Chiu, Chia-Hsuan Yang, Kuan-Wen Su, Ming-Han Tsai, Man-Chin Hua, Sui-Ling Liao, Shen-Hao Lai, Li-Chen Chen, Kuo-Wei Yeh, Jing-Long HuangAbstractBackgroundAtopic eczema and food allergy most commonly occur in the early childhood. However, the relationships between eczema onset and their relevance to the occurrence of atopic diseases relating to allergen sensitization remain unclear.MethodsWe investigated 186 children who were followed up regularly at the clinic for 4 years in a birth cohort study. The c...
Source: Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
ConclusionsThis study revealed a high frequency of relevant comorbidities and that a substantial proportion of patients have late-onset asthma; all these features define specific different disease phenotypes. Severe asthma complexity and comorbidities require multidisciplinary approaches, led by specifically trained pulmonologists and allergists.
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: Atopic eczema and food allergy most commonly occur in the early childhood. However, the relationships between eczema onset and their relevance to the occurrence of atopic diseases relating to allergen sensitization remain unclear. METHODS: We investigated 186 children who were followed up regularly at the clinic for 4 years in a birth cohort study. The children were classified into three groups: early-onset eczema (
Source: Journal of Microbiology, Immunology, and Infection - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: J Microbiol Immunol Infect Source Type: research
Conclusions: In asthma and allergy, multimorbidity and polypharmacy are major concerns. Disease severity, drug use, and costs increased with multimorbid conditions. To reduce the burden, allergy management should be better integrated and more comprehensive.Int Arch Allergy Immunol
Source: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news
This study — known as the Learning Early About Peanut or LEAP trial — showed that children at high risk of developing peanut allergies who are introduced to peanuts at 4 months to 6 months old had a significantly lower risk of developing a peanut allergy than those who waited until they were 5 years; 1.9% of the kids who had peanuts early developed an allergy, compared with 13.7% of the kids who waited. The LEAP trial formed the basis for Monday’s new recommendations, which encourage the early introduction of peanut products in infants at high risk for allergies. But most babies are not at high risk, and ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Food Allergies Source Type: news
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